Monday, June 1, 2020
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cover
Artist: Janek Sprachta
Title: Grow
Format: CD & Vinyl
Label: Midira Records
Multi-instrumentalist Janek Sprachta’s second solo album fuses electronic soundscapes with more traditional piano, guitar, and drums, The clicks and warm hums of the electronica layers are very familiar, the typical and common noises of this light drone genre- beautifully smooth and deeply cathartic, a soothing bath of gentle sound and extremely reverberant, immersive atmosphere. What prevents this release from sounding wholly generic is the acoustic feel of the real instruments.

“Domi” has gamelan-like sounds and a touch of Eastern flavour, while the second track- whose name was badly mangled by the encoding in the promo I received so I’m not even sure what it’s called- is a brief, gently electronica-sprinkled piano ballad.

Sprachta’s primary musical day job is as a drummer, and it’s on “Stones” that he indulges himself with a drum-led piece that’s a masterful bit of balance- part show-off drum solo (light and jazzy, certainly not rock), but part carefully measured and controlled groove. Throughout the whole album, the temptation to show off, the prog rock indulgence of “look how good I am at all these instruments” is admirably and consistently resisted- even down to the modesty of the 36-minute total running time.

“Hello World”, in two parts, opens with a particularly cinematic string-heavy tone of melancholy, before filling out to the album’s busiest section, with a mood of concentration and a sense of passing time. It’s crying out to be paired with a short animation film about loneliness.

The final track and title track Grow is more than twice as long as any other track and an opus in its own right. There are subtly William Orbit flavours in the synth arrangement but with a much wider sense of space. It opens with a couple of minutes of ballad piano which you expect to return towards the end, but instead, we drift off into a supremely long fade, as though finally succumbing to sleep.

The result is an album that just shines with quality. While not breaking any new ground and while not as experimental or avant garde as they might want you to believe, nevertheless it’s a magnificent and beautiful bit of work.

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