Saturday, June 6, 2020
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cover
Artist: Sofus Forsberg (@)
Title: FM Volta
Format: 12"
Label: Mindwaves-Music (@)
Rated: *****
Berlin-based Danish electronica artist Sofus Forsberg has been kicking around since 1998, and 'FM Volta' is his third album, the previous work, 'Udefra' being released in 2005. 'FM Volta' is the first one I've heard though, so I have to base my review solely on it. 'FM Volta' opens up with a barrage of rhythmic plinks and plunks on "Take Fibrillo" that almost seem random until you discern the pattern, and I get the impression that it's all about patterns in Forsberg's musical world, or at least here on 'FM Volta'. It's almost like hyper-speed early Kraftwerk. This is the lengthiest piece on the EP at 7:07, and as it morphs over time more elements are introduced, such as a scraping noise loop, a more defined programmed drum component and bass activity, as well as other ambient synth sonics. "Dear Noft" is still quite active in the rhythm department, but with an overlay of lighter, dream-like synths. "one More Time" employs a hollowish metallic rhythm (undoubtedly ring-modulated) contrasted by ping-pong percussion and other glitchy elements. Moving on to the B-side, "Chineese Swamp" seems steeped in random sample & hold at first until you realize it's not so random. There is definitely a method to Forsberg's madness and after a few listenings, this track seems downright funky! I like the subtle elements employed here although I wouldn't necessarily describe the track as subtle. Very busy in a sort of crazy but productive way. "WMC" dispenses with anything conventionally melodic to begin with using a variety of synth-based loops that are more noise-based than harmonic. The harmonics do come in about halfway through if the form of ghostly chords, and the rhythmic component is more evident, although still somewhat abstract. Final and title track, "FM Volta" is the most accessible and melodic piece on the album. Intriguing shimmery chords are at the core of it, rhythmically backed by hats, and later, some processed drum sounds. Woven in-between are various electronics.

I have to say that Forsberg's 'FM Volta' is as good as anything I've heard by Autechre, being in the same vein, but different somehow. There is less of a tendency to take his compositions far afield, but the experimental vibe is there all the same. I appreciate the artist's focus in the cohesiveness of the tracks presented on 'FM Volta', and this is surely "thinking man's music", although it is not so sterile that it abnegates the human component and feel. It's possible that after repeated listenings you will get to the heart of what Forsberg is trying to convey on 'FM Volta', which is not just simply an exercise of what can be done with modular synthesis. That's kind of a good thing because it keeps you coming back for more. While the album is available in digital download, I'd recommend the 180 gram 12" record, which is limited to 300 copies available from Mindwaves.

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