Monday, September 28, 2020
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cover
Artist: Raglani
Title: Real Colors of the Physical World
Format: 12" + 7"
Label: Mego (@)
Rated: *****
The initial grumbling in "Tongue", the beginning of "Fog Of Interruption", the first of four parts of the 20 minutes lasting suite on A side of this amazing release by Saint Louis-based Joe Raglani, could let you think about the awakening of some monstrous sea crature who slept for centuries in the abyss and the crooked strokes on strings, which sound like twisting together before the entrancing electronic arpeggios of the second part, "Men for Wire", begins to creep into the endoplasmic reticulum of laser beams, the hypnotical computational gurgle of the thid part, "Brutality of the Eye", and the ancestral haziness of church bells, corroded corrugation of sparkling noises and other boiled sonic stimulations of the final part, "March", randomly flutters electrons in the sonic sphere could recall its slow resurfacing, but the abstract feast of old and new recipes in the following track, "The Terrain of Antiquity", which have a similar four parts subdivision ('Ferry Across Marginalia', 'Hollis Albion', 'Mild Power Descending', 'Fireflies of Arcadia') and whose beginning resounds somewhat animalistic and equally thicking for your head, will let you surmise Raglani plunged you into some psychedelic ultraword portayed by The Orb or Future Sound Of London, inhabited by bizarre beings and unexpected entities, which can be recognized in this impressive and somewhat confusing pot of sonic carousel in its catchy alternation of exstatic and hallucinogenic moments, which reaches the boundaries of liturgical atmosphere and 8-bit sonic abandonware. On the enclosed 7", Raglani seems to having squeezed parts of the two longest suites on the 12" in order to concentrate them in two gorgeous shorter tracks, "The Exploded View", which moves towards cybernetic-like reverie, and "Trampoline Dream", whose arpeggioes rended some stages of a platform videogame. Really succulent stuff for abstract synth electronic music.

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