Monday, September 28, 2020
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cover
Artist: Ambient Fabric
Title: In Space
Format: CD
Label: Auraltone Music (@)
Rated: *****
The very first time I heard about Ambient Fabric, the ambient project by the skilled plasmatic Norwegian moulder Oystein Jorgensen, was on the occasion of the absolutely fortuitous listening of a collaborativbe project together with the delicate Austrian musician Susanne MaCu, entitled Melancholia, under Creative Common license (...one of the best invention to explore into vast and deep experimental music oceans!) and I had a good impression on it, even if you don't know the individual style of the signle collaborators, it's quite difficult to isolate the mutual supply to the sound. This new release by Ambient Fabric gave the possibility to me to appreciate more his style and it aroused my curiosity about his previous issues (most of them can be downloaded for free). In Space belongs to that kind of stuff you'd better listen with high quality headphones or (real) hi-fi system in order to grab all nuances so that swimming in the weirdy virtual sensorial pool Oystein is going to catapult the listener into. As you can easily imagine, this album has been described by its creator as a cosmic outing whose starting point cannot be but your terrestrial location. Track by track, your mental journey starting with a track called Starship (a lot of people who accidentally came into my listening room guessed it just after dwelling upon some sonic clues...) could reach some emotional and imaginative peaks throughout a gradual levitational ascension and supposedly some of you could even experience OOBE...I couldn't know if you're skilled enough into astral aural journeys! You could enjoy the dazzling echoes as well as the entrancing dilatations of sound waves of tracks such as The Outer Limit or Cosmos, the symphonic suite of Sphere II, the isolationist sense of flowing peace of Beyond (whereas you'll just hear the buzz of your Spaceship's engine together with some suspensive puffy sounds) or the mute tumbles and the intrusion of the disquieting cry of some mysterious creature living betond solar system of the final Empty Darkness (a track which reminded to me some recordings by Robert Rich oir Tylervision) just closing your eyes, but I can reccomend it's equally enjoyable if you listen to it while virtually jogging over the orbital routes traced on some Solar System "realistic" simulator. Just like I did!

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