Wednesday, September 30, 2020
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cover
Artist: Ketan Bhatti & Ensemble Adapter
Title: Nodding Terms
Format: CD + Download
Label: col legno
Nodding Terms is an energetic attempt to bridge a gap between percussive experimental modern classical music and electronica / club / dance / pop / house / whatever. The result has the sonic qualities of avant garde classical thanks to four-piece Ensemble Adapter, but musical structures that are a bit more accessible and more inclined towards the growing familiarity and accessibility of repeating patterns. However, the bottom line is that it’s still on the former side of the fence- you won’t be hearing this in your local nightclub any time soon.

Some tracks are purely the Ensemble, dominated by cello, bass clarinet and organic live percussion, but others, like “Modul 5”, introduce more prominent electronic lines into the mix.

Bhatti himself has an established history working on music for theatre and dance, and that’s self-evident here- there are some short, off-kilter-tempo’ed and dramatic pieces like “Funkstoff” here that seem absolutely tailor made for contemporary dance and audition pieces. The suspense inherent in “Hast Hussle” and “Kords” feel more aimed at unusual film soundtracks.

Odd time signatures, the use of flute and slightly folkier elements in pieces like “Umziehaktion” make it sound like a sort of modern day instrumental prog rock, in the nicest possible way. As it proceeds, later pieces like “Modul 4” see the theatricality of it return to the fore.

Remixes from two thirds of Brandt Brauer Frick are woven into the core of the album, with the mesmerising original version of “Ferntendez” immediately followed by a Paul Frick remix that delves a little deeper with long pads and staccato cutting. This really works, creating in effect a ‘part one’ and ‘part two’ to that particular work. Other tracks, such as “Laughter Leading”, are also reminiscent of Brandt Brauer Frick productions, and fans of BBF looking for something with a chin-stroking perspective are pretty much guaranteed to appreciate this.

Generally it’s bright, fresh and full of energy that ends up being quite infectious- whether it’s meant to be a feel-good piece thematically is a little unclear, but like it or not, the end result does feel like it was manufactured with a sense of fun attached. But that’s not to take anything away from it- it’s a truly enjoyable listen but also has a lot of merit, and potentially a very useful gateway album for electronica fans peering into the world of avant garde classical.

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