Sunday, May 16, 2021
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R.A. Salvatore: Attack of the Clones (Star Wars Episode II)

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Author: R.A. Salvatore
Title: Attack of the Clones (Star Wars Episode II)
Format: Hardcover
Publisher: Del Ray
Rated: * * * * *

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This book is of course based on the original story and film script by George Lucas. However it is written by R.A. Salvatore known primarily for his works involving Drizzt Do'Urden, a drow, in the Icewind Dale and The Dark Elf trilogies written for AD&D's Forgotten Realms. In this episode Anakin Skywalker remains under the tutelage of Obi Wan as they are summoned to become the body guards for Senator Padmé Amidala from Episode I who has recently had an assassination attempt on her life. The main psychological aspects involved in the story revolve around Anakin and Padme as they become young lovers. The unfortunate senario is that as Jedi Anakin is forbidden attachments such as these. One of the main differences in character as portrayed in writing as opposed to that portrayed in film of Anakin is that he is actually no more rebellious that Luke Skywalker, his son in episodes 4-6. In the film he was made to have a sinister aspect to his character, as we all know he eventually becomes known as the ominous Darth Vader, but this is not the case in the written form. He remains a hero with strong character and morals but who is oftentimes rebellious in that he thinks he can do things better than his teacher or other 'adult' characters in the story. In short, a typical teenager. Another main difference in the written form is that there is more depth to the realm and characters such as the library keeper which Obi Wan must see to gain information on the records of the 'lost planet'. It is mentioned that though she is a venerable old woman many people mistake her for being weak when in truth she is a powerful Jedi not to be fooled with, much like we later see with Yoda. In the story there is also a bit more depth involving the relationship between Jango and Boba Fett. Boba is the clone 'son' of Jango and probably the one thing in his world he actually cares about. There are scenes not in the film in which Jango is training Boba to learn warrior and trade skills of the bounty hunter. Other insight and missing scenes involve the relationship of Anakin's mother and family and how she is kidnapped by the Sandmen. Oddly it is Anakin's love for his mother that causes him such extreme hatred of her killers as he uses the force and Jedi skills to slaughter the entire encampment of them, men, women, and children. Sheer blind hatred because of the love of his mother. Nothing dark and evil - just simple revenge. Something any one of us would feel if our loved ones were taken from us. The story unfolds in which the Republic is failing under the rule of Palpatine (later known as The Emperor and very possibly Darth Sidious as well). The attack on Senator Amidala just before a crucial vote thrusts the Republic even closer to the edge of disaster. Masters Yoda and Mace Windu sense enormous unease. The dark side is growing, clouding the Jedi’s perception of the events. This culminates in an iminent attack by Count Dooku and the Trade Federation against the Republic. In their defense, and Obi Wans investigation, they discover an army of clones supposedly made for them by a Jedi who foresaw this event and is now long dead. These trooper clones are all made from Jango Fett and trained for combat. They come in and defend the Republic and create an interesting situation where for the first time we see troopers on the side of good. Another interesting aspect of this battle is the many Jedi armed with lightsabers fighting mech battledroids. I've never read any of the other Star Wars novels but I found that it was very interesting even though it did follow the movie script almost exactly. There is just enough extras and insight to give you a much better overall perspective of both the general situation of The Force, politics and individual personalities of the characters that simply is not possible in film.

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