Music Reviews



Pris: Love, Labour, Loss

 Posted by Vito Camarretta (@)   Techno / Trance / Goa / Drum'n'Bass / Jungle / Tribal / Trip-Hop
 Edit (9576)
Jan 31 2017
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Artist: Pris
Title: Love, Labour, Loss
Format: 12"
Label: Avian (@)
Rated: *****
It's the anxiety ray talking or pervading the tracks of the second ring in the chain by British Berlin-based producer Jake Woodhouse aka Pris. Following 'This Heavy Heart', its 4-track landing on Avian, the imprint by Shifted, alter-ego of Guy Alexander Brewer (mostly known to drum'n'bass lovers as a leg of the notorious project Commix together with George 'Endian' Levings and Conrad 'JJ' Whittle), 'Love, Labour, Loss' could be considered its sequel under Pris' own admission. Both of these releases seems to have been inspired by the sometimes painful process of growth, accelerated by the relocation to a foreign country, but I would also argue that the self-evident anxiety as mentioned earlier soaking Pris' sound is an irrational but sometimes logically consistent emotional response to the days we mostly experience. Anxiety sounds like gurgling in between the mechanical stress by which he pack the flailing and ghostly entities of the opening "Ad Infinitum", matching to the controversial ridgeline of technology as a tool of liberation and enslavement at the same time while listening both the excerpt and the extended versions of "Divinity"; it (I mean anxiety) almost becomes a subdermal electrical pulse leading to mystical experience in the ambient track "Crux", wraps the sonic wheezing in the suffocating electronic haze of "Sunk" and awakens the dormant instinctive side in the evoking industrial-veined techno hitting of "Feral Calling". Pris' masterfully assembled textures manage to counterbalance this overflowing of anxiety at least!

Sote: 10inch04

 Posted by Vito Camarretta (@)   Techno / Trance / Goa / Drum'n'Bass / Jungle / Tribal / Trip-Hop
 Edit (9572)
Jan 27 2017
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Artist: Sote (@)
Title: 10inch04
Format: 10"
Label: REPITCH Recordings
Rated: *****
A sympathy for hardcore and gabber sonorities and maybe of the so-called pink elephants by Iranian producer Ata Ebtekar aka Sote was evident since some tracks and playlist he posted and played here and there. As in recent days, we're surprisingly witnessing a reprise of supposedly dead sonorities within techno scene; this outputs including a couple of long-lasting hyper-frenzy tracks, dating back the first of the second half of the nineties when the phenomenon of gabber-fuelled or hardcore-jungle rave parties was still booming. The most surprising aspect of both tracks is its quality, higher than the average one of the outputs orbiting around those sonorities. Sote compressed heavily distorted buzzes, thumping claps, amphetaminic pumping, rattling electronic bleeps and unusual insertion of breathtaking pad-synths in the 10 minutes of the massively punching hardcore techno "Neuroenhancer" (built in 1995), whose expanding decay and entropy correctly flows in "In Music I Trust" (a collaborative track he assembled with San Francisco-based DJ and producer in 1997), a bombing tune in between hardcore-jungle and so-called jump-up drum N bass that becomes more and more elastic and corroded (a spaced-out Prodigy-like yell and the abrasive distortion by which these guys filtered a piano string are really bizarre choices) after a somehow disorienting chilling incipit. Nicely dissonant meditation on conventional sonic fuel for old ravers.

Edit Select: Points Of Contact EP

 Posted by Vito Camarretta (@)   Techno / Trance / Goa / Drum'n'Bass / Jungle / Tribal / Trip-Hop
Ambient / Electronica / Ethereal / Dub / Soundscapes / Abstract
 Edit (9568)
Jan 25 2017
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Artist: Edit Select (@)
Title: Points Of Contact EP
Format: 12"
Label: Substrato (@)
Rated: *****
Despite its relatively short presence in the market, Italian label Substrato is already breaching the rockiest hearts of lovers of the genre. Even if Italian media are depicting mountains as terrible and nefarious places due to the earthquakes, large snow avalanches and harsh climatic events that are severely hitting central Italy, mountains are somehow magical places, and Substrato's concept got mostly based on the emphasis of its mysterious majesty and the rejuvenating power of its rocks. The fourth output by the label has the signature of a known name of the scene, the one by British producer Tony Scott, mostly known as Edit Select, his more famous moniker. His mastery in forging techno tunes, coming from many years of experience in the field (he's active since the 90ies), perfectly matches the stylistic path that Substrato is trying to trace, where the combination of the more "acoustic" sonorities of techno and deeper pulsations is aimed to render the meeting of subterranean and surfacing hard rocks of upland regions. Tony reached this goal by means of only three tracks: all of them features punching muffled beats and subtle electronic buzzing, but he adds more gurgling sonorities on "Faction 1" and harsher ones on the synth-driven serpentine of "Tangent" (close to some hybrids of chilling minimal techno and Detroit sound) before reaching the almost ethereal thin air of the deeply atmospheric "Faction 1.1", the highest peak of the whole release. Check it out.

Krishna: Ascend To Nothing

 Posted by Vito Camarretta (@)   Techno / Trance / Goa / Drum'n'Bass / Jungle / Tribal / Trip-Hop
Experimental / Avantgarde / Weird & Wired / Glitch / Noise / Field Recording
 Edit (9557)
Jan 22 2017
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Artist: Krishna (@)
Title: Ascend To Nothing
Format: CD
Label: Silken Tofu
Rated: *****
Some seconds of electronic lubrication - a sort of very quick auto-tune - and the 36 minutes lasting drone-like ascensional track by Krishna, a newly signed project by experimental techno maker Vincent Koreman aka Drvg Cvltvre - and the bicephalous jazzy grind noisy duo Dead Neanderthals by Otto Kokke (saxophone) and Renè Aquarius (drums), turns its thrusters on. The intake by these Neandertals is somehow dead, as Aquarius just adds a 4/4 muffled beat while Kokke plays a single almost constant (effected) sax tone - he opens gain just after ten minutes, closes it back after further three minutes and plays this game till the end of the session -. The primary varying element is the electronic bleeps that Vincent makes boiling and bubbling over the whole drone - these gurgling input sometimes sound like the noise of those plastic calling cards, when they got beaten after a slight bending -. The final result of this almost static interaction is something in between a supposedly psychedelic session by Fuck Buttons and the first seconds of the cartoon theme song of the Italian version Great Mazinger (I admit that I repeated 'Mazingaaaaa' during the listening of "Ascend To Nothing"! Check it here, if you want to have an idea of what I'm talking about: https://youtu.be/bMI8RCVXsno !). After their propulsion reaches the acme around 32-33 minutes, the fuel starts getting lower and lower... that's how this ascension to nothing, recorded at the Extrapool studio in Nijmegen (the oldest city in the Netherlands) in July 2015, tragically finishes its enjoyable ride.

Garaliya: Ventricle Replicant

 Posted by Vito Camarretta (@)   Industrial Noise / Power Noise / Harsh Noise
Techno / Trance / Goa / Drum'n'Bass / Jungle / Tribal / Trip-Hop
Ambient / Electronica / Ethereal / Dub / Soundscapes / Abstract
 Edit (9556)
Jan 22 2017
cover
Artist: Garaliya (@)
Title: Ventricle Replicant
Format: Download Only (MP3 + Lossless)
Label: Kvitnu (@)
Rated: *****
If robots would ever "perfectly" emulate humans, they should be conveniently imperfect. For instance, they would get exposed to the risk of heart attack and other human diseases. Well, this brief releases including five tracks developed by Italian duo Garaliya (Andrea Belloni and Michelangelo Roberti are their names at the registry office) could get matched to imaginary significant cardiac diseases of a robot. The robotic atrial fibrillations of the opening "Ventricle", the decaying blips in the elastic electromechanical loops of "Z-Clones", the buzzing anomalies in the silicon glue of "Serpenter", the imperfect delay on the dystopian piercing tones of "The Roboteer" (close to some outputs by other past entries of Italian electro projects such as Monomorph or Dynamic Wave) or the chest-thumping alien race of the morbid synth sequences on the final "Replicant" could be the soundtrack for a non-existent branch of cardiology in a supposedly forthcoming cyber age. Another juicy sonic pill from the top-playing Ukrainian Wien-based label Kvitnu. Available on CDr as well.


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