Music Reviews



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Artist: Faust Degada (@)
Title: Lux&Uria
Format: CD
Label: Cherryno Music
Rated: *****
One half of the Degada Saf duo, Faust Degada a.k.a. Fausto Crocetta, is releasing his first solo album titled "Lux&uria" for CherryNo Music. Four years ago, Fausto released with Degada Saf their comeback album "Without Religions" (see the review and the interview I did back then) and the year after he started producing music for different artistic events such like 'Human Rights? Art from world' (for Campana dei Caduti Foundation in Rovereto), video-art by Giordano Rizzardi, the play 'Rita e Graziella" by Francesco Scarfone and his music was awarded with a second place at the Roma Europa Festival. The project 'Lux&Uria' started in 2012 for an International Art Exhibition in S.Giorgio a Cremano (Naples) dedicated to 'The seven deadly sins' and, after that, he performed live and now, the album. Containing twelve tracks, the album plays around two concepts: the universal light and the physical being which lives a material life and the different aspects of it. One of them is lust (in Italian: "Lussuria") which, going beyond any moral concept, is an essential part of life. Just like the multifaceted emotions that lust is able to induce into the human being, this album tries to cover them all by alternating danceable tracks and ambient ones. So, we have blasting drums (now recalling dub rhythms and then i.d.m. ones) and complex sound layers creating a throbbing effect (like "Emma Cipapa" the following "I Step On Your Lines And I'm Wrong" or "She Knows My Way") alternated to ambient/i.d.m. tracks which sounds a little more experimental compared to the other tunes (it's the case of "Bapama Punk", "Bopid Manar" and "Lakaw") and a mix of both ("Jamspace" or "Gadem") where we have a sort of house/dub rhythm pattern with ambient atmospheres. There are tracks that sound catchy at the first listening, like "She Knows My Way", thanks to the use of melody, filtered vocals and powerful sounds, then there are other ones that need more attention and time.

Distel: Puur

 Posted by Maurizio Pustianaz (@)   Electronics / EBM / Electronica
Synth Pop / Electro Pop / Synth-Electronica
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May 03 2013
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Artist: Distel (@)
Title: Puur
Format: 12"
Label: Enfant Terrible
Rated: *****
Three years ago Distel released, always for Enfant Terrible, their first 7" containing two songs. Now, three years after and after a couple of tracks released on some compilations, they bring to the attention of industrial electronic lovers their first album titled "Puur". The release contains ten new tracks and it will have a second edition out in May which will come along with an extra two tracks 7", as this first one is limited to only 50 copies! Back to the album, I can say that it totally confirm the good impression I had with their single: it sounds powerful, desperate, sometimes melodic and well arranged. It sounds rich and cold at the same time thanks to the warmth of synth sounds and to the way the noises have been used. Music wise, listening to songs like "Hale" I recalled the early Coil, "Amne", instead, sounds like Depeche Mode covering early Cabaret Voltaire. Electro, industrial and cold wave are all mixed creating a fresh take on... despair. Check the sound excerpts at the label's website and I assure you that you'll reserve a copy of this one!

Stress: The Big Wheel

 Posted by Maurizio Pustianaz (@)   Electronics / EBM / Electronica
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Apr 12 2013
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Artist: Stress
Title: The Big Wheel
Format: CD
Label: Other Voices Records
Rated: *****
The first time I listened to Stress' "The Big Wheel" I had the feeling I already listened to them, but I'll tell you later about this. This compilation I'm reviewing has been compiled by Other Voices records and contains thirteen tracks recorded by Strees for their six tracks MLP issued in 1985 by Alan Rider's own Adventures In Reality and other seven bonus tracks recorded during the 1984/1991 period. "The Big Wheel" is a nice track that reminds of early Portion Control, a bit more melodic mixed with 80s e.b.m. Gathering industrial attitude, dancey intuitions and catchy elements, a bit of cinematic atmospheres (like on "Elizabeth Selwyn"), Alan Rider and Phil Clarke, packed a MLP that contains good songs. Check "Get The Most" or "No Sane Alternative" and you'll be projected back to the years when bands like Attrition, Bushido or many other Third Mind bands. Listening to these tracks you'll get a hint about who influenced labels like KK Records or Zoth Ommog. Anyway, personally, I got a stroke to my heart when I arrived at track seven. The time I listened to "The Prayer Clock" I recalled when I was a kid and my brother Marco came back home from one of his UK trips and brought back "Life At The Top" LP compilation. I liked so much that compilation: it had Coil, Bushido, Attrition and that Stress' fantastic track. I like it as much as Portion Control's "Chew You To Bits". Both are energetic, have dance rhythms and catchy minimal melodies. Withing the bonus tracks you'll find here there are some surprises like "Under Blue Skies" (a melancholic e.b.m. ballad) or the mellow synthpop of "Another Rainy Day" (it could fit the first The The album). This compilation is worth your attention if you are a fan of early e.b.m. or if you are eager to find out some forgotten band of that period.

KMFDM: Kunst

 Posted by Vito Camarretta (@)   Electronics / EBM / Electronica
Industrial Music / Industrial Metal / Aggro Industrial / Electro Metal
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Apr 10 2013
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Artist: KMFDM (@)
Title: Kunst
Format: CD
Label: Metropolis (@)
Rated: *****
The dreadnought KMFDM is maybe the most long-lived industrial dance act even if they often spin self-referring subjects as it happens on the heavily beating initial title-track of their new assault to dancefloors, "Kunst" (their 25th album!), where they quotes some of their previous songs and references, a combustive browsing which connects dots like their imaginary guardian angel (Juke Joint Jezabel) they invoked in their album "Nihil" (1995), the drug against war they patented in "Angst" (1993), the son of a gun they conceived on "Xtort" (1996), supposedly from spit sperm of "Symbols" (1997) by some itchy bitchy mother, portrayed on "What Do You Know, Detschland?" (2007) after casual insemination by some pomaded tacker, who got worried after he knew KMFDM could similarly stand for a death warrant against cultural uniformity ("Kein Mehrheit fur die Mitleid", grammatically incorrect solution of KMFDM acronym meaning "No Majority For Pity", or "Kein Mitleid fur die Mehrheit", id est "No Pity For The Majority" ...) and their shepherds ("Kill MotherFucking Depeche Mode"). After this tracking shot/overview, they throw nine grenades: some of them could sound quite predictable for people who follow them from time immemorial, particularly when they highlight the metal constituent of their blend such as on "Ave Maria", a song which sounds like a parody of market-oriented blasphemy by Marilyn Manson (I don't think the resemblance of distorted guitar riff with the one on "Beutiful People" is fortuitous), "Pseudocide" or the mutating "Hello", even if the insertion of blunt electronic handholds tempers these hooks to more metal-oriented stuff. The most relevant aspect is the fact they managed to shield their iconoclastic attitude, which oozes from any semantic and stylistical orifices of this album: their blow torches point cultural market customs on "The Next Big Thing" ("Mutinous bastards on a treacherous sea/Popes and pastors full of lurid deeds/Whores and harlots spilling seed/pigs and fascists/The next big thing"), fraternize with Pussy Riot on the same titled song by means of contagious electro-metal grooves which sound like chainsaws ("Pussy riot/Hear us roar/An army of tits/Down for the cause/Mother daughter sister unite/rise out of silence/Stand up and fight" where the "dirty" second voice by Sascha Konietzko, whose persuading versatility demonstrates to be in excellent shape just like the talnted singer Lucia Cifarelli, could resemble past vocal roars by Trent Reznor) and moral turpitude of some stupid ethic codes. Their collaboration with Swedish industrial rock band Morlocks, "The Mess You Made", is a proper sonic jewel and the cherry on top in "Kunst", which will presumably enhance many electro-propelled clubs. Long life to KMFDM!
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Artist: Front Line Assembly
Title: AirMech
Format: CD
Label: Metropolis (@)
Rated: *****
Announced in September 2012 and released in the end of 2012, this astonishing studio album by notorious Canadian industrial band Front Line Assembly, born as a sountrack for fre-to-play war strategy game AirMech developed by Seattle-based indipendent company Carbon Games, shows the impressive versatility and adaptability of Bill Leeb's band as well as an interesting update of their sound by means of the integration of sonic hooks from dubstep and electronic sounds for videogames (laser guns, shots, explosions, silicon hisses, robotic belches, cyber farts and so on). Even if there are no lyrics, FLA fans will easily recognize the surgical operation they made on their very first abrasive and essential sound, the one they proudly flaunted before following insertions of stereotyped apocalyptic choirs or conventional guitar riffs, which sounded like a wink at market's tendencies according to many listeners. Someone could argue the incorporation of dubstep elements could be considered the same, but FLA carefully dosed them as Hecq considerably did and authentic sonic pearls like the flaring stepping of "Arise", the amazing metallic crisps of "Pulse Charge" (the closest to Hecq's abrasive dubby concoctions), the translucent industrial rock "Mech Killer", the computational beams of "Everything That Was Before", the bleeding industrial afflatus of the brilliant "Lose", the grim atmospheres of "Stealth Mech" and many other stylistical preciosities will extinguish any doubts about the remarkable quality of this release.


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