Music Reviews



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Artist: Solvent
Title: New Ways - Music From The Documentary "I Dream Of Wires"
Format: CD
Label: Suction Records (@)
Rated: *****
The soundtrack for video-documentary I Dream Of Wires by Robert Fantinatto, who collected a lot of interviews to more and less known inventors and industry leaders (Andreas Schneider, Muff Wiggler Mike, Doepfer, Make Noise, Intellijet, Synthesis Technology/MOTM and so on) or musicians and fans of modular synthesizer such as Carl Criag, Vince Clarke, John Foxx, Ben Edwards, James Holden, Trent Reznor, Richard Devine, Legowelt, Chris Carter, Gary Numan, cEvin Key (Skinny Puppy), Flood and many more, has been commissioned to another lover of those wonderful music machines, Jason Amm, mostly known as Solvent, who turned into a proper full-length where he skillfully tested them out. Named after a combination of the word "theme" and "Phonogene", a synth-module by Make Noise which features "Themogene", the opening track is also the trumping theme song for the whole documentary and its somewhat epic and ostensibly prideful nunce sounds fit for the purpose. The following tracks are going to let lovers of modular synthesis reach multiple orgasms which could come in succession while listening to amazing wave shaping ("Transfer Function"), moog-generated electronic disco samples ("Quantimations"), funny sci-fi nuances of dirtier radiophonic frequencies ("Sender"), vocal-based oddities (such as on "Wow" where the word of the title proceeds to a series of filters and oscillators), well-structured melodic lattices of FM and self-oscillating filter ("Elephant Generators"), modulated snares ("Transfer Function (Reprise)"), a lot of atonal hocus-pocus (such as the VCF-delayed one of "Bucket Brigade") more exotic electronic divertissement (such as the nice "LPGs Over Hawaii"), even iof my favourite track are those ones where Solvent melodicism and synth-pop hooks, which are typical of his style, clearly re-surface such as on the beautiful "Pattern Recognition", "King Vincent" (dedicated to Vince Clarke, which has been interviewed on this interesting video-documentary as well) or "Burn The Tables", the track which better represents the attributes of so-called retro-futurism.
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Artist: Q-Chip
Title: Difference that Makes a Difference EP
Format: 12"
Label: Solar One Music
Rated: *****
Available soon, "Difference that Makes a Difference" is the new EP by Q-Chip, that comes after the split album with Cestrian, released in 2012 by Bunker. Second release for the new Solar One Music "Elektronische Werke" series, the 12" is an electro blast. Since from the opening "Pleasure Anxiety", Q-Chip is ruling the beats with tune that plays around a simple but effective refrain. The main track mix classic dark electro elements such as 808 drum sounds, menacing atmospheres, filtered vocals and cool analogue synth sounds. "Sense Data" plays with mystery using bleeping sounds and robotic atmospheres that, if you love the Dopplereffekt music, you'll found familiar. "The Way Of The Future" closes this cool release with a 4/4 electro techno atmosphere which is working really well. Q-Chip isn't an innovator but creates great electro tracks that are in balance from cinematic atmospheres and robotic cold paranoia. Check it now, here soundcloud.com/solar_one_music/q-chip-difference-that-makes-a
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Artist: Dynarec
Title: Exomove EP
Format: 12"
Label: Solar One Music
Rated: *****
Recently released on Solar One Music, "Exomove EP" is the latest 12" by Dynarec. Born on early '00s, Dynarec is headed by a mysterious producer who has on his shoulders two albums ("User Input" on 2004 for Delsin, "Overland Travelling" for the Italian Nature Records and the new "Silver Tourist" for Bass Agenda Recordings). The mysterious man behind Dynarec founded his own label Vaporwave and released in the years four 12" and two digital releases of his project. Anyway, "Exomove" is part of the new Solar One Music "Elektronische Werke" series and bring to the lovers of Detroit electro techno, four new tracks to dance to. "All Automatic", "Double Postpone", "Exomove" and "Water Meadow" pass from nervous syncopated rhythms of "All Automatic" (a catchy Detroit techno influenced electro beast) and "Double Postpone" (a pounding 4/4 psychotic tune with dissonant stabs) to electro classics (the title track and "Water Meadow" are really nice tracks that will please so much Drexciya lovers). This great release is limited to 250 copies, so get yours soon. Check the sounds here soundcloud.com/solar_one_music/dynarec-exomove-ep
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Artist: Ø (@)
Title: Konstellaatio
Format: CD
Label: Sähkö Recordings (@)
Rated: *****
After his name has been associated to emanations of noisy particles whose penetrating property could be able to shake any configuration of inorganic matter by means of a set of remarkable releases, Finnish sound artist and composer Mika Vainio revives his "slashed o" named project which skyrockets his sonorities towards childish reverie of cosmic peregrinations. Whereas last outputs by Mika seems to be drifted towards saturation and breaking points, "Konstellaatio" orbit around empty spaces and its sparse wavelets on pure electronic frequencies sound like gears of propulsive engines. The first half of this album condenses bubbles of very low frequencies whose sequenced explosions let emanates clipped beats, gusts of cosmic streams, whistling dark stars, ongoing dim coruscations, electronic air blows and sonic coils: in spite of the undeniable charm of tracks like the opening "Otava", the weirdest "Kesayon haltijat" (Finnish for "Holders of a Midsummer Night"), the eerily shakes of "Syvyydessa kimallus" (supposedly meaning "at a depth of sparkle") and the subatomic resounding specks of "Neutronit", some connoisseurs could perceive their similarity with other previously explored sonorities on epic sonic poems by Autechre or Andrew Lagowski's S.E.T.I.. "Elaman puu" (Finnish expression for "the Tree Of Life"), a track which reminded a sonic emotion I experienced while listening a guy playing the organ inside Temppeliaukio Kirkko, the notorious Church of the Rock in Helsinki, ushers in the most interesting part of this album, where Mika's sound rarefies by degrees as if he replays some pieces of his vast sound-bank while coming closer to perfect vacuum. Proper masterpieces which follow this "strategy" are "Talvipaiva, vanha motelli" - the track that he tributed to Harold Budd - and "SyvaÌnteessaÌ pukinjalkaisen", where a menacing entity seems to be awaken from the initial silent cavities that got evoked by the first part of the track. This journey ends with "Takaisin", a wonderful reversion where the most emotional side of the above-mentioned childish reverie got rendered by placental bass tones, music-box-like shimmers and an entrancing microdub ticking.
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Artist: The Truth About Frank (@)
Title: The Carrion EP
Format: CD
Label: LYF Recordings
Rated: *****
I had previously reviewed 'Cannibal Work Ethic' by The Truth About Frank, so I thought that I had some idea of what I was in for. Still, this is a pretty weird album by most standards. The 22 minute opening salvo, 'About Frank,' is a barrage of cut ups and samples of dialogue that sound like someone took Negativland's complete discography and threw it in a blender. It changes direction like an ADD person with a TV remote control and 1000 channels. The sound of a man gasping for air is interspersed with blasts of jarring music and samples describing our own private hells. About 15 minutes in it becomes a bit more consistent, with moronic laughter cut in with a slow, methodical beat, but even this sense of consistency is an illusion. So what do we know about Frank? If this song is an indicator, he's not all there. 'Organism Dying In Transit' takes us into less spastic territory, but keeps the weird feel going, with 'SmoKing' easing us out with a short number that keeps the same trajectory. Overall, if you like cut ups, you'll probably enjoy this. If not, you won't. I get the feeling that this is a love it or hate it kind of disc. I enjoyed it, so I fall into the former camp. If you like Negativland's work and Nurse with Wound's 'To the Quiet Men From a Tiny Girl,' this might be up your alley. This album weighs in at around 33 minutes.
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