Music Reviews



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Artist: Udo Schindler & Manon-Liu Winter (@)
Title: form & material
Format: CD
Label: Creative Sources (@)
Rated: *****
This is the second recording I introduce on this zine that the appreciated maximalist Portuguese label Creative Sources took from the vibrant house of Udo Schindler, after the one where his hospitable and brilliant owner met Austrian pianist Elisabeth Harnik, who performed on Udo's Pleyetl piano - already successfully tested by renowned musicians such as Hans Poppel, Masako Ohta, Katharina Weber, Izumi Ise and Alexa Montani - and it seems that it won't be the last release that came from his SALON fur Klang + Kunst for the aural pleasure of sonci diggers. Besides being a sort of intimate dandy place for experimental performers and musicians, Udo's salon is becoming a proper forge of fine soundscapes and the one he made together with another inventive Austrian pianist Manon-Liu Winter, who improvised a performance on 30th November 2012 after she accepted the invitation by Udo to join his salon after he got positively impressed by her performance with Franz Hautzinger at Kaleidophon Festival in 2009, is really amazing for the impressive versatility as well as for the bizarre techniques she tests in order to widen the performative and sonic possibilities of piano, which is evident since the opening track where the faintly feverish cadence of the first seconds suddenly turns into almost menacing smothered rumbles before sliding into a tricky delicate phrasing on the following track, which gradually twist along itself by getting a proper tonal tangle where Udo seems to do a series of ribbond by means of his soprano saxophone. The whole release is a carousel of musical suggestions, ranging from abstract meditations such as the narcotic fifth track to strange declensions of chamber music ("liudo 7", "liudo 4") and deviously eruptive moments such as the above mentioned second track till the wonderful final "liudo" where the seemingly exhausted performers manage to set a really breathtaking piece up.
Artist: Lost Tribes
Title: Solace
Format: 12"
Label: Avant! Records
There are, I think, three logically possible ways of combining electronics and punk. First, you can do punk and then use some synths to reach a certain sounds that you wouldn't be able to reach only with guitars. Many hardcore bands can have this approach sooner or later, and basically it depends on the fact that, while they're recording an album or an ep, in the studio there are some synths and they use it ('Ok well, to enrich our gloomy atmosphere, let's put some basic lines of organs!'). The result is usually nice IF THE BAND PLAYS GOOD PUNK. Conversely, there are bands who are completely into electronics music and they use some guitars to enrich their sounds. Consider for instance Alien Vampires: they do (horror) trance/ebm, but since Nysrok is also a talented guitarist here and there they make use of guitars. Nice result too. Finally, there are bands that combine hardcore guitars and electronics and they form a real hybrid: they play neither 'punk with some synths' nor 'ebm with guitars' but they play something else. Digital hardcore is a good case in point. I'm terribly sorry for this long introduction, but it was necessary to introduce this band called 'Lost Tribes' produced by the very good label Avant! Records. Lost tribes' 'Solace' is an album combining hardcore punk, with crust vocals, with some little tiny synths (some moog bass-like and pipe organs). And that's it. I don't see exactly why one should buy such an album if he is into electronics. I mean, this is a crust album (not particularly original) with some synths. I have the impression - probably I'm wrong - that this band is supposed to play the mix of electronics and punk of the third kind. But this is not the case. Therefore, I cannot rate this album since for Chaindlk is out of topic.
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Artist: The P-Project
Title: Gravities
Format: CD
Label: Creative Sources (@)
Rated: *****
One of the most interesting diversion from the already wide stylistical range that the maximalist Portuguese label Creative Sources has recently provided comes from The P-Project, a German quartet by Peter "Worringer" Alexius (guitar, loops), Joe Hertenstein (drums), Sebastian Gramss (double bass...but he prefers to call its instrument spacebass, that is to say double bass with sympathetic strings -!- on this occasion) and sound designer Joker Nies (raw electronics) as even if they recorded nine real time improvisations with no overdubs, each track sounds somewhat more groovy than most of the stuff that come from Ernesto Rodrigues' imprint and their grooves are somehow parabolic of course: the funniest voices on "Gravities", needless to say, are the ones that Joker Nies, hose personal sonic equipment includes modified Texas Instruments games or enhanced toy keyboards, wisely inoculates as its electronic entities squeak like mad lemmings on the elegant "Never Ending", sound like weirdly gurgling over the bluesy guitar by Alexius on "Sweet Like Trouble", catalyse caddywhompus progressions like "See It Coming" or ""Shock Proof", lights up the slyly bizarre "You Know I Was Alone With Her" and other gonky moments of the record, hack up electronic phlegm on the two parts of "Forgotten Hollow" just like an intelligent prank or the non-sense wit in a Kumbaya meeting!
Feb 17 2015
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Artist: Hot Guts
Title: Wilds
Format: 12"
Label: Avant!
Rated: *****
Hot Guts is a peculiar band from Philly (I lived there for almost ten months but didn't know about their existence'¦unfortunately). They started as a punk band and then they evolved into something quite unexpected from a punk band. I mean'¦bands today can have access to any kind of instrument without being rich, so these are amazing times to chart the development of quite traditional genre such as punk and to see what happens. Hot Guts say to play a sort of minimal electronics close to EBM with some tribal industrial and neofolk hints. Actually, I don't think it's an appropriate description. There is something more than simply 'minimal electronics' (whatever this means!). I think that the backbone of Hot Guts' songs is genuinely krautrock, that is a sort of 'cosmic music' open and somehow ethereal with interesting minimalist guitars. Clearly, this is not old fashioned krautrock, but it is a contemporary interpretation of that attitude. There are wise arrangements with samples providing the idea that songs are carefully designed from the first to the last second. Finally, the Neofolk touch: spoken worlds, or at least with a minimal tone. Therefore: krautrock with cutting edge instruments meets punk and Death in June. Fucking amazing! Produced by the interesting label Avant! Records on vinyl.
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Artist: Great Waitress (@)
Title: Flock
Format: CD
Label: Creative Sources (@)
Rated: *****
A sort of nightmarish sleepwalking that sound like tunneling by means of feeble whistles, sinister squeaking and frequencies which seems to dig metallic surfaces and gettting more and more amplified during their tortuous journey in the matter opens the interesting listening experience, which got painstakingly offered by Great Waitress, a trio of female improvisors consisting of Laura Altman (clarinet), Monica Brooks (accordion) and Magda Mayas (prepared piano), an ensemble of women - a rather unusual line-up in this field of music - that built two long-lasting tracks where they cross a wide set of extended techniques, bizarre dynamics and oblique sonic transitions in the beginning of 2013 in two different locations in Sidney. The first track, "Rite", that reaches more and more piercing sonorities and almost stunning minute hypnotic sonic fracking from the above-described tuning where amplification and impressive reverberations played an important role, got recorded by Jon Hunter at Paddington Uniting Church in January 2013, while the second track "Sownder", whose cavernous beginning let listeners figure out the quaking ways these performers follow to harmonize themselves as well as the disorienting oscillations that seal their perpetual tuning little by little, got recorded by Jim Denley at Glebe Cafe Church in February 2013. You are going to get easily ear-humped by this great waitress...
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