Music Reviews



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Artist: rodach-schlothauer-weiser (@)
Title: Fuzzylogics
Format: CD
Label: Timescraper (@)
Rated: *****
Self-confident people often use their face to intoduce themselves on a picture: a model or a product spokeperson do that for money, politicians show dazzling smiles and fake teeth for their puppet shows, so that I think that it's by far better when a musician puts his face on the cover artwork, particularly when they're remarkably experienced like these three gentlemen. I'd say 1957 was a a good year as they were all born when Lennon and McCartney or Simon and Garfunkel began to co-sign some songs or they would probably prefer to remember those year as the period when Berthold Brecht and his wife Helen Weigel were working at Berliner Ensemble as two of the three musicians of Fuzzyogics - Burkhard Schlothauer (electric violin), one of the founder of minimalistic Wandelweiser composer grup and long-lasting member of Zeitkratzer Ensemble, and Michael Rodach (electirc guitars) - used to play there in 2005. Even though they could fell they've already reached their apex, I won't say they are at the twilight of their artistic paths after the listening of this awesome record. Do not expect something revolutionary or miracolous, but I'm pretty sure that they are aware their way of being revolutionary lays in their absence of aim as they just dive into music, which sounds mind-blowing for its androgynous equidistance from any kind of labelling. More or less distant echoes of classical music, jazz, progressive rock, dub and even blues or country (check the cradling metamorphosis on "Work On!" if you don't belive me) harmoniously clot on pleasant sonic cauldrons, which often smell like de-harnessed reveries or mystical flights ("I have a Dream", "Pulse Streams", "Sirene"), dadaist profiling ("Last Exit") or untiring rituals ("Miles Groams", "Pulse Streams"). Smartly fuzzy!
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Artist: Thomas B (@)
Title: Sugar and Spice EP
Format: Download Only (MP3 + Lossless)
Label: Free Love Digi
Rated: *****
Formerly known as Tommy Tarzan, a moniker by which he mainly signed some jungle-oriented stuff, Thomas B decided to explore the boundaries of bass-driven music and provides a couple of good tracks on Quentis Hiatus' imprint Free Love Digi which taste like ginger candies as you can guess from the guessed title of this resounding tidbit. The sweeteners of the first track "Poblano" are some airy vocal samples and a girly scream - the most mischivious listeners could surmise it could mirror Jane Parker as a legacy of Tommy old moniker! - over a peaceful chilling dub movement, while the spicy element is the buzzing of a low frequency as well as the recorded small talk - I ignoreits source - where two people speak about the state of radiophonic music, whose main aim is making money. The two flavours are even more amalgamated on the following track "Nectar", where hi-hats of the previous track fade out and a slightly brushed minimal groove bears the brunt of soft sonic sprays and an entrancing bass worm. An appetizer, "The Middle", is available as a free download on Free Love Digi's website.
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Artist: Gomila Park
Title: Ununoctium
Format: 12"
Label: Raster-Noton (@)
Rated: *****
This new radioactive element in Raster Noton's periodic table Unum Series is a Swedish lanthanide by Gomila Park, the collaborative project by Palma de Maiorca-based producers (and Dabid Bowie fans!) Carl Michael von Hausswolff and Martin Rossel. The very first sonic monads of the opening "Leibniz" - they tributed the title of two of the three tracks of this release to the notorious philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and the pioneering mathematician Ramon Llull, who laid the foundation of the binary system and the digital age, according to their perspective - could sound like a possible remix of Depeche Mode's "Personal Jesus" by Trent Reznor and the stomping match between distorted guitar and a syncopated steamroller keeps on feeding such a creeping (but really endearing!) diffeomorphism before sliding into the awesome gargling by means of a sneaking analogue sequence and heavily sliced vocals (including loud snores, hysterical laughters, buzzes and fits of coughing!) on "Ramon Llull", whose captivating sound could let you hope some flu bug will turn humans into analogue synths sooner or later. The metamorphosis into an electromechanical chrysalis got wisely completed on the final "Calculus".
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Artist: Seba
Title: Nothing Can Replace (John B remix)/Too Much Too Soon (Blu Mar Ten remix)
Format: Download Only (MP3 + Lossless)
Label: Secret Operations (@)
Rated: *****
Two of my favorite tracks from Seba's masterpiece Identity has been givn to a couple of two bass masters by Secret Operations and in spite of the gruelling make-up on the original versions, I think that Seba followers won't dislike the final result. The most difficult task was the one assigned to well-known producer John B - mainly known for being the owner of Beta Recordings and its constellation of labels (Tangent, Chihuahua, Nu Electro) as well as for his recurring crossbreeds of trance-oriented sonorities -, who turned the lovely "Nothing Can Replace", which featured the great voice by Kirsty Hawkshaw, into a massively shaking bass-driven bomb, which could surmise the heavy stabs that Chase'n'Status often inject in their declension of d'n'b. The approach by Blu Mar Ten on "Too Much Too Soon", another great liquid shot on "Identity", has been less invasive, as they opted for maximum harmosation between daydreaming halo of the original input - they didn't modify or slice original vocals - and bouncy rolling breaks by means of occasional nebulisation on sounds, which already were quite crystalline, and more hits, which didn't transfigure the effectiveness of Seba's track.
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Artist: Boston (@)
Title: Catch Your Breath / For Grace
Format: Download Only (MP3 + Lossless)
Label: Symmetry (@)
Rated: *****
The second single on Break's label Symmetry by Welsh producer Jack Boston, a really brilliant rising star beyond his young age, includes a couple of tracks, where the balance between melodies and sudden sonic entities, which resurfaces from fine-grained solid breaks, make them enjoyable both for dancing and just listening. The break of "Catch Your Break" is maybe quite simple, but its shotgun style perfectly keep fluffy guitar chords, bass ripples and cool sounds together, while "For Grace" sounds like mirroring its title by a jazzy amalgamation of elements, including a really warm bass and an effective guitar sample, which easily slides into listener's eardrums and minds. A couple of excellent examples of liquid drum'n'bass, which doesn't work like a sleeping poison.
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