Music Reviews



cover
Artist: Alessandra Eramo
Title: Tracing South
Format: 12" vinyl + Download
Label: Corvo Records
On “Tracing South”, Berlin-based sound artist Alessendra Eramo focuses very heavily on experiments with her own voice, in a theatrical and not over-processed manner that harks back several decades. Eramo repeats words and phrases, overlapping, looping, and counterpointing both linguistic and a-lingual vocal noises, often as the sole instrument. Around this work is a fairly light smattering of more modern-sounding electronic elements to add occasional extra textures- found sounds, and on rare occasions theremin and harmonica (all played by Eramo herself).

It all works best when it is either at its most playful, tinkering with sonic ideas, or most simple. “Really Very Gut!”, with its over-effusive repetition of the ‘really very’, is bordering on childish, but very likeable, while the more electronics-heavy “My Favourite A Train” is probably both the most accomplished and most unusual piece here, while final piece “When I Look Into Your Eyes” is a purist singer’s showcase.

When it ‘goes serious’ then it is perhaps more of a mixed bag. The juxtaposition of curt grunts with longer vocal drones on “Vacio” is very nicely executed, while the pure vocal performance at the root of “Primitive Bird” is both beautiful and impressive. However at times, such as on “I Cannot Neglect The Sea”, there’s a certain amount of self-indulgence to the introspection, which doesn’t seem to sit as well as it might.

“Song For The Sun (Carnival Rites)” takes a totally different tack, blending together recordings of carnival music and celebration that devolve weirdly into radio white noise for a middle-of-the-album track that sounds like it’s been lifted from a totally different work, but which is intriguing in its own right.

An applaudable collection of pieces from a very strong experimental vocalist.
cover
Artist: Ghost Vision
Title: Mirdoar / Ozen
Format: 12" vinyl + Download
Label: P&F
“Belearic slow burners” is what these two tracks are pitched as, and it’s an apt description. Leisurely, organic house grooves, smooth keys and pads that channel 80’s pop ballads, and a jazzy piano that somehow manages to avoid sounding cheesy even when technically it’s definitely cheesy, it’s a confidently relaxed pair of tracks for sunbathing.

First track “Mirdaor” is a fairly simple seven-minute groove without much progression, and fine for it, while “Ozen” is a more ambitious twelve minute number that draws you in with sweet what-world-music-sounded-like-in-the-90’s atmospherics and some nicely indulgent breakdowns that are electronica with an endearingly backwards-looking feel.

Some may find it so close to lift musak for comfort, but for me it’s deftly handled and well-made lounge-house.
cover
Artist: Moscoman
Title: Wave Rave
Format: 12" vinyl + Download
Label: Life And Death
After catching Moscoman’s “I Ran” release from last year on his own Disco Halal label, a new EP was very welcome. This one’s now on the Life And Death label but the style, and the quality, has remained consistent across these four new tracks of melodic, synthy instrumental house with a warm, analogue but not wholly retro flavour.

The title track is built around a bright chord scheme and enjoys itself, a fairly simple bit of feel-good instrumental electropop in a DJ-friendly format. “Dinner For One” is a little darker and wobblier, with soft rumbling bass, a scratchy, meandering distorted synth lead note, and an unusual and very confident breakdown involving near-silence and light but militaristic snare patterns.

There’s a bouncy, slightly 90’s feel to the slow unfolding and twangy guitar work of “550”, which ends up being my favourite of the pack, while final track “Space Comfort” is another bright number with an almost endearing naivety to it that recalls the heady early days of instrumental synthpop where absolutely nothing seemed to be regarded as cheesy.

Another strong, accessible and surprisingly poppy pack from Moscoman, perfect for filling your set with a bit of bright electro cheer.
cover
Artist: Arovane + Porya Hatami
Title: C.H.R.O.N.O.S.
Format: 12" vinyl + Download
Label: Karlrecords
Arovane and Porya Hatami’s third collaborative album is another rich ambient affair that blends together a selection of luxury ingredients- soft pads, electronic textures and granular noises, and processed found sounds. The recipe’s not surprising but it’s handled with thoughtfulness and care, spreading just the right level of detail and mystery into the mix to keep the listener immersed and just on the edge of engaged.

The staccato piano sounds in opener “Ellipsoid” are a distinctive melodic element that gives proceedings a more classical feel, but this isn’t really sustained, and as it progresses things become generally a little less note-driven and more washy. The long synth-string pads of “Cycloid” are enchanting, if a little bit ‘new age-y’. “Helicoid” brings in bell tones but instead of a new age tone, there’s just a shade of discordance and suspense that takes things in the right direction- though careful falling asleep with its dripping water sounds playing, as such noises can have adverse effects on some sleepers...

As the rainfall-ish sounds fade away at the close of final track “Cissoid” you’d have to be really quite hard-hearted not to feel relaxed and completive about the whole affair. Rich, luxuriant late-night ambience.
cover
Artist: Kukangendai
Title: Palm
Format: 12" vinyl + Download
Label: Ideologic Organ
Although introduced as a “kick ass rock trio”, it’s only the instrumental arrangements and sonic make-up of Kukangendai’s album “Palm” that aligns with that description. The composition and performance is something very different, an introspective and experimental affair that’s certainly prog rock at times but which also travels further into jazz rhythms and avantgarde noodling, as well as exhibiting more modern influences.

The repetitive pulsing of “Mure” brings to mind minimal slow techno being generated by a rock band, while “Menomae” sounds like a dissected glam rock that’s been stripped to the bones and then skeletally reassembled to resemble a different beast. Final track “Chigaukoto wo Kangaeyo” shows the mellower side and borders on charming.

At 35 minutes and 6 tracks, it’s a compact and very focussed short album that doesn’t try to pack in too many ideas or any real stretch of variety, sticking to a relatively minimal set of pulses and rhythm explorations that’s very listenable and generally unchallenging. Intriguing and atmospheric work, but certainly not “kick ass”, and not about to rock your world.
[ Next ] [ Previous ]

[1...10] [11...20] [21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27] [28] [29] [30] [31...40] [41...50] [51...60] [61...70] [71...80] [81...90] [91...100] [101...110] [111...120] [121...130] [131...140] [141...150] [151...160] [161...170] [171...180] [181...190] [191...200] [201...210] [211...220] [221...230] [231...240] [241...250] [251...260] [261...270] [271...280] [281...290] [291...300] [301...310] [311...320] [321...330] [331...340] [341...350] [351...360] [361...370] [371...380] [381...390] [391...400] [401...410] [411...420] [421...430] [431...440] [441...450] [451...460] [461...470] [471...480] [481...490] [491...500] [501...510] [511...520] [521...530] [531...540] [541...550] [551...560] [561...570] [571...580] [581...590] [591...600] [601...610] [611...620] [621...630] [631...640] [641...650] [651...660] [661...670] [671...680] [681...690] [691...700] [701...710] [711...720] [721...730] [731...740] [741...750] [751...760] [761...770] [771...780] [781...790] [791...800] [801...810] [811...820] [821...830] [831...840] [841...850] [851...860] [861...870] [871...880] [881...890] [891...900] [901...910] [911...920] [921...930] [931...940] [941...950] [951...960] [961...970] [971...980] [981...990] [991...1000] [1001...1010] [1011...1020] [1021...1030] [1031...1040] [1041...1050] [1051...1060] [1061...1070] [1071...1080] [1081...1090] [1091...1100] [1101...1110] [1111...1120] [1121...1130] [1131...1140] [1141...1150] [1151...1160] [1161...1170] [1171...1180] [1181...1190] [1191...1200] [1201...1210] [1211...1220] [1221...1230] [1231...1240] [1241...1250] [1251...1260] [1261...1270] [1271...1280] [1281...1290] [1291...1300] [1301...1310] [1311...1320] [1321...1330] [1331...1340] [1341...1350] [1351...1360] [1361...1370] [1371...1380] [1381...1390] [1391...1400] [1401...1410] [1411...1420] [1421...1430] [1431...1440] [1441...1450] [1451...1460] [1461...1470] [1471...1480] [1481...1490] [1491...1500] [1501...1510] [1511...1520] [1521...1530] [1531...1540] [1541...1550] [1551...1560] [1561...1570] [1571...1580] [1581...1590] [1591...1600] [1601...1610] [1611...1620] [1621...1630] [1631...1640] [1641...1650] [1651...1660] [1661...1670] [1671...1680] [1681...1690] [1691...1700] [1701...1710] [1711...1720] [1721...1730] [1731...1740] [1741...1750] [1751...1760] [1761...1770] [1771...1780] [1781...1790] [1791...1800] [1801...1810] [1811...1820] [1821...1830] [1831...1840] [1841...1850] [1851...1860] [1861...1870] [1871...1880] [1881...1890] [1891...1900] [1901...1910] [1911...1920] [1921...1930] [1931...1940] [1941...1950] [1951...1960] [1961...1970] [1971...1980] [1981...1990] [1991...2000] [2001...2010] [2011...2020] [2021...2030] [2031...2040] [2041...2050] [2051...2060] [2061...2070] [2071...2080]


Search All Reviews:
[ Advanced Search ]

Chain D.L.K. design by Marc Urselli
Suffusion WordPress theme by Sayontan Sinha