Music Reviews



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Artist: Krishna (@)
Title: Ascend To Nothing
Format: CD
Label: Silken Tofu
Rated: *****
Some seconds of electronic lubrication - a sort of very quick auto-tune - and the 36 minutes lasting drone-like ascensional track by Krishna, a newly signed project by experimental techno maker Vincent Koreman aka Drvg Cvltvre - and the bicephalous jazzy grind noisy duo Dead Neanderthals by Otto Kokke (saxophone) and Renè Aquarius (drums), turns its thrusters on. The intake by these Neandertals is somehow dead, as Aquarius just adds a 4/4 muffled beat while Kokke plays a single almost constant (effected) sax tone - he opens gain just after ten minutes, closes it back after further three minutes and plays this game till the end of the session -. The primary varying element is the electronic bleeps that Vincent makes boiling and bubbling over the whole drone - these gurgling input sometimes sound like the noise of those plastic calling cards, when they got beaten after a slight bending -. The final result of this almost static interaction is something in between a supposedly psychedelic session by Fuck Buttons and the first seconds of the cartoon theme song of the Italian version Great Mazinger (I admit that I repeated 'Mazingaaaaa' during the listening of "Ascend To Nothing"! Check it here, if you want to have an idea of what I'm talking about: https://youtu.be/bMI8RCVXsno !). After their propulsion reaches the acme around 32-33 minutes, the fuel starts getting lower and lower... that's how this ascension to nothing, recorded at the Extrapool studio in Nijmegen (the oldest city in the Netherlands) in July 2015, tragically finishes its enjoyable ride.
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Artist: Garaliya (@)
Title: Ventricle Replicant
Format: Download Only (MP3 + Lossless)
Label: Kvitnu (@)
Rated: *****
If robots would ever "perfectly" emulate humans, they should be conveniently imperfect. For instance, they would get exposed to the risk of heart attack and other human diseases. Well, this brief releases including five tracks developed by Italian duo Garaliya (Andrea Belloni and Michelangelo Roberti are their names at the registry office) could get matched to imaginary significant cardiac diseases of a robot. The robotic atrial fibrillations of the opening "Ventricle", the decaying blips in the elastic electromechanical loops of "Z-Clones", the buzzing anomalies in the silicon glue of "Serpenter", the imperfect delay on the dystopian piercing tones of "The Roboteer" (close to some outputs by other past entries of Italian electro projects such as Monomorph or Dynamic Wave) or the chest-thumping alien race of the morbid synth sequences on the final "Replicant" could be the soundtrack for a non-existent branch of cardiology in a supposedly forthcoming cyber age. Another juicy sonic pill from the top-playing Ukrainian Wien-based label Kvitnu. Available on CDr as well.
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Artist: Mia Zabelka (@)
Title: Monday Sessions
Format: CD
Label: Creative Sources (@)
Rated: *****
5th January, 12th January, 19th January, 4th February of the year 2015 have a thin red line (or I'd rather say a black line, considering their color on a calendar). They occurred on Monday, the first five Mondays of that year to be precise during which Mia Zabelka decided to record these ten improvisations at Klanghaus in Untergrieth, a small village in southern Austrian Styria using her acoustic violin. I don't know if she got somehow influenced by the typical aversion (if not real idiosyncrasy) that working people are generally supposed to feel against the first day of the week, as part of the dramatic stages she masterfully manages to evoke by the awesome way she plays violin or her voice (one of the funniest moment of this release is the vocal track "Oscillations", a whirlpool of mourns, sneers, suffocated wails, choked shrieks, neighs, hiccups, whose extreme and fast-rolling changes could let you think a jester having some epileptic fit) sound perfect for the mindset of people, who got influenced by such a figment of calendar-related imagination. It's pretty bizarre a cliche got evoked by a performing style, the one by Zabelka, which completely avoids cliches, as highlighted by the introductory words of the inner meaning of Mia's improvising by well-known guitarist John Russel printed on the inlay: "We are improvisers to the core, acknowledging an 'everthen that everwas' while constantly trying to subvert and go beyond the mundane. The core of the music is found at any point and is completely malleable making the musical choices that provide a 'narrative' a uniquely personal experience.". Violin tones could get matched to wood-shavings during a sawmilling intended to turn a log into sawdust in "Concentring Circles" or 'flavour enhancers' for the staggering pace of some performative escalations - in tracks like "Imminent Disaster", "Papagei" (German for 'parrots', a funny tracks where Mia seems to emulate those cute birds by the integrated use of violin and voice) or the opening "Dunkles zu sagen" - or tonal expectorating of introspections and mental convolutions ("Stream of Consciousness", "Remembrance"). They sometimes disappear to acquire a percussive functions in tracks where Mia seems to exploits the 'hidden' percussive or noisy features of violin, as it happens on "Stroemungen," "Entfremdung" (a German word whose translation could describe such an extended use of violin, as it could be translated both as alienation or estrangement and as an exception of the destination for purposes that are different from the intended one!). Mia's outputs can also be listened and enjoyed during other days of the week.
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Artist: Keru Not Ever
Title: Tereza
Format: Download Only (MP3 + Lossless)
Label: Infinite Machine
“Tereza” is a collection of angular, glitchy cold synthesized soundscapes, mostly arhythmic yet still percussive. It’s a January release that conjures images of some of the less mellow aspects of Northern winter weather.

There’s a variety of moods here, ranging from the expansive emptiness of the contrarily-named “Closers” to the threatening claustrophobic spikiness of “Blue Strobe Pastiche”. Each piece tends to around the five minute mark, which is mostly fair as the progressions and evolutions within each are subtle, though not non-existent. In the final minute of “Closers” there’s the distant sound of techno, as though you’re stood at the North Pole surrounded by snow but suddenly you realise there’s a nightclub two miles away.

There are faintly Eastern and ethnic tones in tracks like “Ode to the Past, Present and Future” and “Fusing Zeitgeist” which seem anachronistic in the mostly icy environments, yet they end up fitting rather nicely and giving the album a more distinct identity overall. Meanwhile, more esoterically, “Airflow! Velocity” samples something akin to the sound of trainers (sorry, ‘sneakers’) on a basketball court while a bulldozer approaches to demolish the gym- sonic combinations so random and disassociative that they stop being evocative of anything and become attention-seekingly weird in their own right.

The latter sections of the album settle down somewhat, from “Dogville” to the end, is mellow longer tones prevail, natural piano noises tinkle and the sidechained processing calms.

Overall it’s an unorthodox twist on a fairly well-established cold soundscape style, with an interesting if not constantly welcoming character.
Jan 19 2017
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Artist: Mos Emvy (@)
Title: Next To Me
Format: Download Only (MP3 only)
Label: blocSonic
Distributor: Archive.org
A two track digital ep of lush, larger-than-life melodies with smooth, harmonic vocals that surfs on rolling synth waves, Mos Emvy is a respite in a New Era of commercialized Hip Hop. Mos Emvy is alias of Cincinnati, Ohio-based hip hop artist and producer, Bryan McCorvey. McCorvey was schooled by his father in digital music production at a young age, who then grew to make instrumentals as early forays before also taking to vocals. McCorvey's influences range from luminaries like Jay Z and Nas to bands one would not normally associate with hip hop such as Nine Inch Nails, which is refreshing. While Hip Hop is narrative to a beat, it is also a genre not shy to experiment with its historic use of drum machine and sampled beats, record sample vocal fragments and audio collage as well as unconventional audio textures. The Next to Me ep title track recalls Burial's dubstep rhythms and bass that interplay with trance techno keyboards and eerie ghostly female backing vocals then pierced by Mos Emvy's harmonic rhymes to layers of electronics. “You won't see me” overtones darker electronics that sweep with ray gun intensity and some wailing feedback that either is an electric guitar or sounds a lot like one, accompanied with aggressive, driving beats. Mos Emvy delivers his lyrics with black belt martial arts precision and topical depth and maturity. This ep is produced by Apex and sounds great with more presence than you would expect from an mp3 release, as in 'I can't believe its mp3!'. Mos Emvy is a talent who embraces hard and lush electronics to deliver the goods and is an artist worth anticipating more great work from.
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