Music Reviews



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Artist: A. K. Klosowski
Title: ... plays the Kassetteninstrument
Format: 12" vinyl + Download
Label: Gagarin Records
A precursor to the “Hometaping Is Killing Music” album created with Pyrolator, “Plays The Kassetteninstrument” is the unearthed solo recordings of A. K. Klowoski inventing his own instrument, constructed from eight Sony Walkmen, and toying with ideas and rhythms in a manner that strictly speaking might not be called sampling. However it is strongly analogous to other sampling experiments of the early 1980’s, where music concrete and found sound finally began to step out of its art-house pigeonhole, morph into ‘sampling’ as most people would think of it today, and make its way into the clubs and the pop charts.

It’s an interesting time capsule of a release, not always pleasant to listen to, but captivating throughout anyway. The source materials that Klosowski has borrowed are very formative without being easily distinguished; I think I can make out brass bands and Hendrix amongst the more prominent orchestral classics and old black-and-white movie numbers.

Tracks like “Newsticker” incorporate frantic but simple drum patterns, giving the tracks a mechanical structure and form that feels like a slightly unnecessary invasion of the punk ethos. Underneath the sometimes invasive drum machine there are parts of a beautiful ambient album calling out to be heard.

There are sillier moments too, like “Rot Glocken” with its childish squeaking and the tango-like rhythms of closer “XXX”. Certain theatrical elements here are reminiscent of some Pierre Henry works, and there’s a certain 1960’s Radiophonic Workshop-ish tone to “Lamento”.

Arguably this material wasn’t incredibly pioneering for 1984- there are parallels to the Beatles’ “Revolution 9” in some of the principles, and the Art Of Noise had already released “Beatbox” by now. But as a sonic curiosity, a dip into one of the more esoteric forgotten pieces of 1980’s cassette culture, there’s a lot to go on in here.
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Artist: Daniel K. Böhm
Title: Carrier
Format: CD
Label: Eilean Rec.
Rated: *****
Another very interesting proposal by the excellent French label Eilean is the official debut release by American sound artist Daniel K.Böhm, introducing himself in his Bandcamp as a disgraced physicist whose career was remarkably compromised by the accidental melting of a reactor in Wüttenschlesig, who decided to live in a sort of self-isolated dimension in an abandoned cotton farm nearby Spur in Texas. As there are no official chronicles, documenting such a disaster in Germany, I could guess that Daniel invented this fictional identity just like many supposedly prodigious or particularly inventive teens do. The reason why I made such a comparison to explain such a bizarre mimicry derives from the listening of his album, which almost invariably recalls a childish dimension or I'd rather say a controlled regressive behavior. Besides the nostalgic hook, particularly vivid both when Daniel seems to invite listeners to an enchanted daydreaming over the sound of music boxes and pleasantly hypnotic vibraphones and when he creates trapping guitar-driven miniatures, such a regression got pushed by other interesting stylistic choices: the occasional recurrence of tape manipulation, a format that smells like regression; some melodies that could vaguely evoke similar returns to innocence by first steps by Kieran Hebden (Four Tet) - you could notice some similarities between vibraphone-driven Daniel's "Componium Orbit" and Four Tet's "Hands" -; the iterations of toytronics in tracks like "Mangrove" and "Critter"; the recursive use of injecting somehow old-fashioned synth loops that pushes memory back to German kosmische muzak, as if they were resurfacing memories (particularly in "Under Rhodes"). However Daniel doesn't let his head fall back on the soft and scented pillows of pre-puberty, but he rolls his sound behind with a recognisable sophistication, as you can easily guess by the sketched description of some tracks of this "Carrier" and even though the structure of many tracks is often quite simple, the whole album doesn't sound predictable or banal. It just demands devotional attention and its grace could persuade to make a fuss of his sound. Just like an innocent baby!
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Artist: M Is We
Title: Feels Like Five Days
Format: Download Only (MP3 + Lossless)
Label: Silber Records
Five furious tracks, five minutes.
Raw, unpolished, like five demos.
Grungy teenage garage band ethos.
Jarring extracts yet no surprises.
Not long enough to explore.

As part of Silber Records’ ongoing 5in5 series, where an artist creates five one-minute-long tracks to create a five-minute-long mini-release, post-punk M is We’s contribution is a echo-ey, primitive-sounding collection of what feels like five potential introductions to interesting works, unfinished. The abrupt ending on some of the tracks adds to the sense of these being extracts.

Music with such a languid pace and immersive drone-like aesthetic doesn’t squeeze all that nicely into a 5in5 concept perhaps better suited to higher-tempo pieces, making this feel more like a free promo sampler than a complete mini-album as others have managed.
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Artist: Katie Gately (@)
Title: Color
Format: Download Only (MP3 + Lossless)
Label: Tri Angle Records (@)
Though identifying herself with the found sound tradition or an experimental avantgarde, from the off “Color” is a pop album. Yes, the building blocks may all be sampled real-life noises, but there’s lyrics aplenty and a verse-chorus sensibility throughout that has more in common with Matthew Herbert’s pop collaborations than with the darker histories of music concrete. Fans of Roisin Murphy would be the first people I’d recommend this to, but not the last.

That’s not to say there isn’t darkness here. Tracks like “Sift” toe a delicate line between melody and discord, with an immersive, packed production aesthetic that makes you sit up and take notice.

Raised in Brooklyn, Katie has also clearly absorbed a healthy diet of electro and hip-hop that can be felt infusing the tone of tracks like “Tuck”. Blended with and playing against theatrical touches worthy of Kate Bush and a splash of Björk-like irreverence, it’s a fascinating overall mix and definitely worth checking out if you like your avantgarde music with an alt-radio-friendly EQ.
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Artist: Noctilucant (@)
Title: Oblivion to You All
Format: Download Only (MP3 + Lossless)
Label: self-released
Rated: *****
Noctilucant, the dark ambient project of Joseph Mlodik from Wisconsin is back with a new work titled 'Oblivion to You All'. After the excellent debut, 'Back to the Mud' which I reviewed a while ago, Noctilucant will have to raise the bar or lower the water to top that one. 'Oblivion to You All' is a conceptual album of ten tracks set in a
post-apocalyptic world. Beginning with "Introspective Dissolution" Noctilucant sets the stage with deep, rumbling space drones and a recitation by Kara Phillips of the symphonic power metal band Magma Dragon about how the world after its devastation, now without power, and a poisoned water supply has entered an ice age. I'm not big on these narrations (never much cared for any of those Moody Blues spoken word bits) but Kara's voice with what I detect to be an Aussie accent lends a certain sci-fi cred, like a sample lifted out of a movie. This foreboding piece is certainly the harbinger of bad things to come. "This Day Brings Forth Our Destiny" starts with what sounds like a film projector being switched on, then white noise wind in the distance underpinned by a rumbling drone ever drawing closer, then a frozen crystalline ambience that is beautiful in its form, yet terrifying in its isolation. In capturing the audial image of a frozen world, Noctilucant definitely succeeds. "The First Light of Morning" bestows more deep drone rumbling, and gives you the feeling that...something may be out there...but you know not what. "Where Snow Remains and Light Fades" explores the cold isolation a bit more subtly, but is actually far more frightening than the previous track. Here your mind begins to play tricks, and ghostly images of past seem to eerily float around you. There is a sense of activity; possibly some scavenging, foraging. A discovery is made - "The Old Machine Shop" that once produced vital goods now lies dormant as a museum piece, its mechanical song once a paean to an industrious future is now but a rusted relic of the past. "Those Peaceful Days of Our Past?" - where are they now? Do they exist in only fading memory? A vague melody that thrums in the recesses of the brain, a bittersweet reminder of life as it once was, the songs of life that are sung no more. To escape this blighted landscape, I crawl "Back Into the Hole Where I was Born," but there is no comfort there, only pictures of my family that fell victim to this catastrophe. Soon, in despair and death, I too will be gone. It is said, that when you stare into the abyss, the abyss stares back into you. The "Devouring
Night" absorbs all into its blackness. It is all-encompassing. There is no escape, no rescue, no reprieve. And so, this is the fate to which we've been consigned. In the final frozen gasps of life, "Oblivion To You All" are the only words that are uttered. In the aftermath, "And the Far Unlit Unknown," spirits wander the cosmos in search of succor and meaning. Is there any to be found? You will never know until you get there...

Well, that's it, the doomsday scenario is complete...or is it? There's a bonus track- "She Only Comes Out at Night," a rather terrifying little number designed to ensure all your dreams will be nightmares. If this doesn't scare the crap out of you, I don't know what will. Yes, Noctilucant has raised the bar in the dark ambient realm with 'Oblivion to You All'. The only question is, where do we go from here?
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