Music Reviews



cover
Artist: ELEH + Richard Chartier
Title: LINELEH II
Format: CD
Label: LINE (@)
Rated: *****
The temptation to check the second part after I enjoyed the first one of this collaborative release by Richard Chartier and ELEH (have a read on the words about the first part to see who are these guys) was too strong. Compared to the first half (or I'd better say to the first third, considering the fact that the length of LINELEH II is nearly twice the one of LINELEH I), there are some elements of variation. In order to reprise the medical comparison I adopted for the previous review, the first minutes of this second part could sound like the screening of heart pulsations of someone under a drug-induced coma. A slow drop-like pulsation is audible during them, but the set slowly changes. The surrounding drone seems to rise little by little and that pulsation seems to have been turned into a muted hiss as if it comes from an empty large space. The listening experience is seemingly static as you'll find different slow transitions and mutations of the intangible substance they manipulated till the moment when the audible elements become so thin that they could evoke a journey into a sort of a metaphysical nothingness. Like the first part, it's a matter of (physical and mental) space and time again and, as I already said on that occasion, a pair of headphones or an excellent set for a quiet amplification is recommended.
cover
Artist: ELEH + Richard Chartier (@)
Title: LINELEH I
Format: CD
Label: LINE (@)
Rated: *****
This is the shortest (just 73 minutes lasting...a pittance in relation to the 128 minutes of the second part) and the first of a two parts collaborative release by two masters of so-called 'muted drones' like Richard Chartier, the co-founder of 12k's auxiliary label LINE and the man behind Pinkcourtesyphone, and ELEH, an unidentified (having no real or shown registered identity) flying project that already landed on labels like John Brien Jr's imprint Important Records, Touch and Taiga, following the reciprocal knowledge and appreciation of personal outputs. It belongs to that kind of projects where the setting where you decide to use it could have an important role, a matter of time (due to its remarkable length) and space then, whose enjoyment could provide somehow surprising mental journeys. Whether you reach some satori-like enlightenment or you travel through the observation of dust particulates flowing in your room when hit by a sun ray filtered through a window, these guys know how to set parameters for an entrancing listening experience. I could compare this first part of LINELEH to a long-lasting CAT scan, where the sound makers control the rotation of electromagnetic scan as well as the scan and the medical liquids that will stream through your body to remove any formation to clean tumours pressing on the cognitive processing centres of your brain. Well, this entrancing intersection of sinewaves and very low frequencies (created and revised between 2015 and 2016) won't maybe have such a therapeutical effect, but lovers of drones will be surely delighted by the listening experience they provided in this set. A pair of very good headphones is warmly recommended.
cover
Artist: Mun Sing
Title: Witness EP
Format: Download Only (MP3 + Lossless)
Label: Infinite Machine
“Witness” is a pack of four short, dark, frenetic techno pounders rounded off with an extra remix. Focussed almost entirely around clipped and frantic drum patterns, adding surprisingly sporadic acid basslines, and with broad use of stereo and light smatterings of melodic percussion, it’s a very focussed and determined sonic attitude.

After the hammering broken-techno plateau of “Revenge”, “Eye” is a darker and growlier beast awash with distortion- post-dubstep angrily mangled. “An Illusion” dives into the sub-bass with robotic gut-punch sounds and sporadic reverberant clangs. “Emerald” takes some more organic-sounding tom and kick sounds and pitch-shifts them into quirkiness in a way that’s more of a cerebral exercise in musical moiré patterns than it is dance music.

The sole remix from Urquieta adds extra melodic elements to “Revenge”, not changing the drum arrangements particularly but softening it up via a re-EQ that makes it feel like it’s been re-performed in a new environment.

Every track is succinct, generally around the four minute mark, making its point and never overstaying a welcome.

Infinite Machine deliver the goods again with another pack of dark techno to confuse and delight.
cover
Artist: Ivvy
Title: Safe Within
Format: 12"
Label: Medical Records
“Safe Within” is a very focussed 4-track 12” EP of US techno with an above-average tempo and a relentless, no-frills drive.

After a moody intro, “Big Rat” breaks into a thick kick drum pattern over which metallic patterns clang and reverb. “Safe Within” initially feels like just a re-run of the first track with a hihat added, but does eventually pitch off in a different direction with a twangier higher-end pattern.

“See Something” has the same slightly Underworld-ish rapid-fire kick but substantially softened, allowing more space for an almost didgeridoo-like drone and more advanced other percussion patterns. “SK One” (which to me means central Stockport but that’s probably not what they meant) follows similar patterns but with a slightly more industrial tone which is gradually joined by ravey alarm tones that feel like they ought to be building to something, but don’t.

A very purposeful and direct collection of kick-thump techno, distinctly lacking in variety within the EP but definitely a strong DJ weapon.
cover
Artist: Giulio Aldinucci
Title: Borders And Ruins
Format: 12" vinyl + Download
Label: Karlrecords
Italian sound artist Aldinucci’s first release on Karlrecords is a 50-minute collection of eight thickly layered ambient soundscapes comprising electronics, choral tones, found sounds and atmospheres with a deeply reverential and reverberant tone throughout. It’s an extensive audio sigh with a rich and cinematic tone and a very soporific atmosphere.

After the choir-heavy opening of “Exodus Mandala”, “Division” is a more industrial-toned affair. An arcing background electric hum gives an extra sense of unease in “Parole”, that goes beyond the initial worry that there’s a fault in one of your speaker cables, before the relaxing choral sonic carpet returns in “Venus Of The Bees”.

“The Pray (Dissonant Association)” has a more synthetic feel to it, the longest piece in which the washes and envelopes are more overtly expressed. “Chrysalis” has the same construction but alternates between two choral notes in a manner that begins to feel like a Philip Glass work. Final track “The Skype Cloud And Your Smile On The Left” feels like the most conventionally melodic, in relative terms, dipping towards being a digital lullaby of sorts.

It’s a rich, consistent and velvety bit of sound layering which isn’t overshadowed or made excessively sacral by the use of choral tones. All rather lush and premium stuff.
[ Next ] [ Previous ]

[1...10] [11...20] [21...30] [31...40] [41...50] [51...60] [61...70] [71...80] [81...90] [91...100] [101...110] [111...120] [121...130] [131] [132] [133] [134] [135] [136] [137] [138] [139] [140] [141...150] [151...160] [161...170] [171...180] [181...190] [191...200] [201...210] [211...220] [221...230] [231...240] [241...250] [251...260] [261...270] [271...280] [281...290] [291...300] [301...310] [311...320] [321...330] [331...340] [341...350] [351...360] [361...370] [371...380] [381...390] [391...400] [401...410] [411...420] [421...430] [431...440] [441...450] [451...460] [461...470] [471...480] [481...490] [491...500] [501...510] [511...520] [521...530] [531...540] [541...550] [551...560] [561...570] [571...580] [581...590] [591...600] [601...610] [611...620] [621...630] [631...640] [641...650] [651...660] [661...670] [671...680] [681...690] [691...700] [701...710] [711...720] [721...730] [731...740] [741...750] [751...760] [761...770] [771...780] [781...790] [791...800] [801...810] [811...820] [821...830] [831...840] [841...850] [851...860] [861...870] [871...880] [881...890] [891...900] [901...910] [911...920] [921...930] [931...940] [941...950] [951...960] [961...970] [971...980] [981...990] [991...1000] [1001...1010] [1011...1020] [1021...1030] [1031...1040] [1041...1050] [1051...1060] [1061...1070] [1071...1080] [1081...1090] [1091...1100] [1101...1110] [1111...1120] [1121...1130] [1131...1140] [1141...1150] [1151...1160] [1161...1170] [1171...1180] [1181...1190] [1191...1200] [1201...1210] [1211...1220] [1221...1230] [1231...1240] [1241...1250] [1251...1260] [1261...1270] [1271...1280] [1281...1290] [1291...1300] [1301...1310] [1311...1320] [1321...1330] [1331...1340] [1341...1350] [1351...1360] [1361...1370] [1371...1380] [1381...1390] [1391...1400] [1401...1410] [1411...1420] [1421...1430] [1431...1440] [1441...1450] [1451...1460] [1461...1470] [1471...1480] [1481...1490] [1491...1500] [1501...1510] [1511...1520] [1521...1530] [1531...1540] [1541...1550] [1551...1560] [1561...1570] [1571...1580] [1581...1590] [1591...1600] [1601...1610] [1611...1620] [1621...1630] [1631...1640] [1641...1650] [1651...1660] [1661...1670] [1671...1680] [1681...1690] [1691...1700] [1701...1710] [1711...1720] [1721...1730] [1731...1740] [1741...1750] [1751...1760] [1761...1770] [1771...1780] [1781...1790] [1791...1800] [1801...1810] [1811...1820] [1821...1830] [1831...1840] [1841...1850] [1851...1860] [1861...1870] [1871...1880] [1881...1890] [1891...1900] [1901...1910] [1911...1920] [1921...1930] [1931...1940] [1941...1950] [1951...1960] [1961...1970] [1971...1980] [1981...1990] [1991...2000] [2001...2010] [2011...2020] [2021...2030]


Search All Reviews:
[ Advanced Search ]

Chain D.L.K. design by Marc Urselli
Suffusion WordPress theme by Sayontan Sinha