Music/id=564 Reviews



cover
Artist: Alessio Santini
Title: Kenter
Format: CD + Download
Label: Elli Records
“Kenter” is a four-track EP constructed solely from electric guitar and acoustic drums (and occasional vocals if we’re being pedantic), but processed filtered and post-produced extensively to fill it out into a rounded production of glitchy modern darkwave.

“Ffar” revolves around an ominous three-note theme that’s ‘bad guys slowly marching’ in film language, but second track “Sul Mae Nero” is more stripped back, with quieter drones, no central pattern, and this gives the glitchier sounds and atmosphere more room to breathe. The main distorted guitar re-appears with high shock value, with just an edge of gothic vocal that sounds like it happened to be recording in the room next door. Short third track “Sndaz Majorii” is equally open, but with whispered threats and more distortion to make something properly unsettling, before final track “Destroy Destroyers” is, despite its title, a lighter piece of soft pad-like guitar reverb tones and frenetic high-pitched drum glitching.

An impressive exercise in guitar processing and drum glitching, “Kenter” lives in very well-trodden dark and ominous territory but manages to forge its own unique tone nevertheless.
cover
Artist: Frore & Shane Morris (@)
Title: Eclipse
Format: CD + Download
Label: Spotted Peccary Music (@)
Rated: *****
'Eclipse' is the second collaboration between Frore (Paul Casper) and Shane Morris after their previous 'Blood Moon' (2015). Together these musician composers explore the boundaries of ambient and tribal, merging the organic with the electronic. Utilizing digital and analog synths, didgeridoo, ethnic flutes, gongs, djembe, singing bowls, frame drum, and udu pots, Frore and Shane take the listener on a journey to the depths of the psyche through primordial roots to transcendental peaks and lush valleys. Hypnotic hand-drumming plays a large part in this, with nearly every track exhibiting some sort of polyrhythm. The drums are rather upfront in the mix too when they need to be, nearly ceremonial in their manner. Synths of course carry the ambience in sustained drone-like pads as you might expect. Throughout the eight somewhat lengthy tracks on 'Eclipse' there is an aura of mystery and magic that emphasizes the ritualistic and shamanic. The music is neither complete dark nor light, but falls into that grey area that the title and CD cover perfectly illustrates. A good amount of this must have been improvised but these guys work so well together there is no stepping on toes, nothing out of context, nothing that doesn't work or feel contrived. While there is melodicism the melodic content is amorphous supportive of the ambiance rather than dominating it. That may seem (in description) that the music is simplistic, but in actuality, far from it. The layering is complex in that there is much going on within the ambiences. Believe me this is full, rich and heady stuff. I know from my experience with Malaysian Pale back in the '80s that making electronic world music of substance can be a real challenge. Here Frore and Morris live up to and often surpass the challenge in a path well-trodden by other artists in the ambient-tribal domain such as Vidna Obmana, Steve Roach, Robert Rich, Matthias Grassow and other similar artists. The flow from track to track is really great too lending itself to a seamless listening experience with nothing disjunct or jarring by juxtaposition. The only misgiving I had about 'Eclipse' was on the final track "A Lonely Path" where it seemed like it should have been building to some conclusion but just ended up petering out. The artists likely had a different take on this but to me it seemed inconclusive. Overall though this is a very worthy work if you're into ambient-tribal, and will probably spend a good while on my current and future playlists.
Nov 18 2017
cover
Artist: COH
Title: COHGS
Format: 12" vinyl + Download
Label: Editions Mego
COH, more commonly found putting out instrumental releases, here gathers together 8 vocal tracks, some previously released, some unreleased. But rather than showcasing vocalists, these works include mostly quite modest, often spoken-word vocal elements into a soft-edged downtempo electronica of pulses, clicks and pads.

“Sleepwalker” is a particularly engaging oddity, a beatless and spacious arrangement with a lovely sub-bass pulse under Anna Yamada’s long pure notes, then an totally unexpected organ crescendo. “Alcohol”, with Noriko Taguchi, plays like a drunken child’s lullaby and final track, and “Curious Yellow” a sparse, melancholy piano ballad.

The sonic flipside of those tracks is “Love’s Septic Domain”, a darker and distorted affair with screaming and allusions to dirty hospitals, there to ensure you don’t confuse this release for a chillout album.

Don’t expect a pack of eight full-on pop performances, to put it mildly. Little Annie’s “46 Things I Did Today” is a beat poem set to blipping arpeggio patterns. Peter Christopherson’s whispered spoken-word on “Silence Is Golden” is barely intelligible under a bubbling bed of acid-tinged bleeps. Ann Demeulemeester is barely present on the light, piano-centred opening track “Exercise In Colour”.

It’s an interesting collection, diverse in a way that doesn’t necessarily imply incoherence, and should appeal to fans of Susumu Yokota et al.
cover
Artist: Felix Kubin
Title: Takt Der Arbeit
Format: 12" vinyl + Download
Label: Editions Mego
Starting life as a soundtrack to a series of 16mm films on the theme of ‘work’, “Takt Der Arbeit” has expanded into a 4-track, 32-minute series of steady, light-industrial percussive environments with a slightly playful air.

“Musik für neue Büromaschinen” is an office soundtrack with steady organic percussion playing against a range of telephone and modem noises, with the odd Apple start-up sound and possibly a dot matrix printer in there for good measure. Principally it’s a novelty setting for some nicely virtuoso tuned and untuned percussion work.

“Geburt eines Schiffes” is a more sombre affair, slower plainer drumming underpinning gradually building sustained notes of tension, before an unexpected shift halfway through to an odd music concrete of old newsreel dialogue, sampled fanfares and a form of big reveal which gradually winds its way back to a new steady rhythm- perhaps the titular ship’s unveiling and first launch. In which case the final few minutes of sombre xylophone mood are harder to explain without the pictures.

“Martial Arts” is, as the title may suggest, a sharper affair, repeating xylophone(-ish) patterns with a faintly ethnic flavour over a more urgent-sounding rhythm that is interrupted somewhat less. On top of this are some old-fashioned electronic bleeps and wobbles to add just a smattering of electronica. Things get progressively weirder with shades of avantgarde jazz towards the end.

Final track “Uhren”, again as the title suggests, brings a sense of clockwork regularity and the reassuring effect of steady mechanics, with a glockenspiel or similar meandering some kind of musical code over the top consisting of distinct short note patterns which repeat and then disappear.

It’s a warm and very accessible collection of soundtrack pieces which would be very interesting to see with picture accompaniment, not dissimilar to the Cinematic Orchestra’s “Man With A Movie Camera” in parts but with less conventional melody and more rhythmic surprises. Top notch stuff and certainly worth a listen.
cover
Artist: Mother Of Mars
Title: Seed 2 Sky
Format: 12"
Label: Ransom Note Records
New York-based duo Vito & Druzzi, formerly (or possibly still currently) members of The Rapture, offer up their debut release under the name Mother Of Mars, and it’s a pair of ten-minute long, slowly evolving and arpeggiating synth-electronica which mixes tones of late-era Tangerine Dream or Jean-Michel Jarre with an extremely gentle house kick and some slightly African-tinged percussion elements.

The track structures are akin to minimal progressive techno but the sawtooth-tinged synth washes build into a sound that couldn’t be described as minimal, reaching an almost prog-rock noodling climax at the end of “Hera In The Valley”. While the first track is quite euphoric, second track “Seed 2 Sky” is subtler, with a little extra tension, though this washes away in favour of soft synth pads gradually, and a slightly vague synth lead line that has further hints of Jarre.

It’s a lush pair of tracks with an exceptional polish, a really exemplary piece of electronica that shows that it’s possible to layer these synth stylings in a way that sounds fresh rather than only an 80’s retro affair. It’s a sign that Mother Of Mars is definitely a name to keep an eye out for, here’s hoping there’ll be an album.
[ Next ]

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11...20] [21...30] [31...40] [41...50] [51...60] [61...70] [71...80] [81...90] [91...100] [101...110] [111...120] [121...130] [131...140] [141...150] [151...160] [161...170] [171...180] [181...190] [191...200] [201...210] [211...220] [221...230] [231...240] [241...250] [251...260] [261...270] [271...280] [281...290] [291...300] [301...310] [311...320] [321...330] [331...340] [341...350] [351...360] [361...370] [371...380] [381...390] [391...400] [401...410] [411...420] [421...430] [431...440] [441...450] [451...460] [461...470] [471...480] [481...490] [491...500] [501...510] [511...520] [521...530] [531...540] [541...550] [551...560] [561...570] [571...580] [581...590] [591...600] [601...610] [611...620] [621...630] [631...640] [641...650] [651...660] [661...670] [671...680] [681...690] [691...700] [701...710] [711...720] [721...730] [731...740] [741...750] [751...760] [761...770] [771...780] [781...790] [791...800] [801...810] [811...820] [821...830] [831...840] [841...850] [851...860] [861...870] [871...880] [881...890] [891...900] [901...910] [911...920] [921...930] [931...940] [941...950] [951...960] [961...970] [971...980] [981...990] [991...1000] [1001...1010] [1011...1020] [1021...1030] [1031...1040] [1041...1050] [1051...1060] [1061...1070] [1071...1080] [1081...1090] [1091...1100] [1101...1110] [1111...1120] [1121...1130] [1131...1140] [1141...1150] [1151...1160] [1161...1170] [1171...1180] [1181...1190] [1191...1200] [1201...1210] [1211...1220] [1221...1230] [1231...1240] [1241...1250] [1251...1260] [1261...1270] [1271...1280] [1281...1290] [1291...1300] [1301...1310] [1311...1320] [1321...1330] [1331...1340] [1341...1350] [1351...1360] [1361...1370] [1371...1380] [1381...1390] [1391...1400] [1401...1410] [1411...1420] [1421...1430] [1431...1440] [1441...1450] [1451...1460] [1461...1470] [1471...1480] [1481...1490] [1491...1500] [1501...1510] [1511...1520] [1521...1530] [1531...1540] [1541...1550] [1551...1560] [1561...1570] [1571...1580] [1581...1590] [1591...1600] [1601...1610] [1611...1620] [1621...1630] [1631...1640] [1641...1650] [1651...1660] [1661...1670] [1671...1680] [1681...1690] [1691...1700] [1701...1710] [1711...1720] [1721...1730] [1731...1740] [1741...1750] [1751...1760] [1761...1770] [1771...1780] [1781...1790] [1791...1800] [1801...1810] [1811...1820] [1821...1830] [1831...1840] [1841...1850] [1851...1860] [1861...1870] [1871...1880] [1881...1890] [1891...1900] [1901...1910]


Search All Reviews:
[ Advanced Search ]

Chain D.L.K. design by Marc Urselli
Suffusion WordPress theme by Sayontan Sinha