Music Reviews

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Artist: And Then You Die (@)
Title: Lord of the Flies
Format: CD + Download
Label: Skithund Records (@)
Rated: *****
And Then You Die has been touted as Finland's best kept music secret, so it comes as no surprise that I (and most likely you too) have never heard of them before now. Since 2003 they've released five albums 'Lord of the Flies' being their fifth) and just as many, if not more singles, and I understand they've been around since 1990 or so. To me, this is remarkable since I found the music on 'LOTF' quite compelling. They call their music Finnish underground depressive experimental post-industrial psychedelic rock, and that is pretty close to the truth. The album is only 7 tracks and weighs it at slightly over 33 minutes, so it's brief and doesn't wear out its welcome. Beginning with the fast-paced straight-ahead beat driven "Idiot," drawn out vocals glide over the rampant and unwavering rhythm like a surfer over Hawaiian waves. There's a bit of a synth break in the middle before things pick up again. The guitar plucks out a monotonous but remarkably effective riff, and in its punkish splendor with a similar pacing to Eno's "Third Uncle". Things take a stranger turn on "Damp Idea" where buzzy bass hits are juxtaposed by twinkling synth. The vocals are a bit more defined on this one, and when the rhythm gets going, it's like Nine Inch Nails meets David Bowie in some psychedelic arena. Still, the vocals are somewhat understated, almost like a singer turning his back to the audience. I don't know if the drums are played or programmed but whichever, they're marvelous in a big beat sort of way. The aforementioned similarity to Bowie really comes to fore in "Formant" where the vocalist seems to have similar vocal characteristics as latter-day Bowie in the warble and vibratro. The enigmatic lyrics also support this. "The Box" is similarly inclined, albeit with a different groove. Speaking of grooves, I've noticed that once a song gets into a groove, it pretty much stays there without variation. The tone is definitely dark, and the melodicism makes it pop, but deep underground psych-pop. There's something primal about it that cuts to the bone, and manages to avoid many (although not all) of the cliches found in industrial rock these days. Interestingly as the album progresses, the more intense yet more ambiguous it seems to get. If one had to choose a single from 'LOTF' it would likely be "The Tide" oozing sinister psychedelia. Final track, "Turn" only deepens the mystery in its psychedelic sludge. Something about 'Lord of the Flies' really resonated with me from start to finish the first time, and every other time I listened to it. Seldom does that happen these days. I urge you to check it out and see if does with you too.



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