Music Reviews

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Artist: Rydberg
Title: s/t
Format: CD
Label: Monotype Records (@)
Rated: *****
I've frankly never noticed that hot tap water could sound darker than cold one - maybe the sound of heater could be perceived as something sinister -, but I'll pay more attention to this obsrvation that someone wrote on the introductory words of this collaborative release by Berlin-based metamorphic sound artist and performer Nicholas Bussmann (aka Resistance, The Beige Oscillator and Nicholas Desamory, some of his aliases without quoting the plenty of collaborations he made...), who focused on the liminal areas between club music and experimentation, and Wien-based Werner Dafeldecker, whose electroacoustic-driven sound and realistic "environmentalism" crossed many different bodies of human knowledge such as architecture, physics (the name of this collaborative project seems to be a reference to Rydberg atom), photography and cinema. This release is a sort of tuning to the surltry days this couple experienced in Bussmann's recording studio in Kreuzberg during the particularly humid and hot summer of 2013 in Berlin, where weather conditions on the limit of what they can stand inevitably affected their sound, which seems to acquisce in the gloppy perspiration caused by the wet hot air, that got vividly rendered by the slow electronic patterns, the sliding friction of field recordings and the laborious attrition where electric glimmers and samples seem to plod through on the opening "Elevator" - where the field recordings of an elevator got suffocated by thich sonic steams - as well as by the sweaty dub and the amazing analog-driven meshes of the following "Gardening" and the final bath of sweat on the amazing post-techno suite "And The Science", whose sliding running of melting electronic and elements over a set of riding hi and low-hats defines the most fluid (and my favorite) moment of the release. Nice way to turn uncomfortable red-hot days into sound.



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