Music Reviews

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Artist: Christian Wallumrød (@)
Title: Pianokammer
Format: CD
Label: Hubro (@)
Rated: *****
If you had the possibility to listen to something by Norwegian pianist and composer Christian Wallumrod - one of the most appreciated musician of contemporary music scene from Norway -, you'll find this interesting release - his first solo album, as he got mainly engaged with different ensembles - slightly different from his usual path as some similarities could be find with a performance he used to play some years ago, which got inspired to neo-dadaist Fluxus movement. "Pianokammer" includes six pieces, which got recorded on many different grand pianos and in different venues between the end of 2013 and the first half of 2014 and shows the most experimental side of this talented pianist, who gets closer to isolationist ambient on the opening track, the first "Fahrkunst", where a sort of ghastly tonal undertow and a wavering tremolo feeds a drone that seems to render the absorption of a piano tone by surrounding objects in slow motion. The following "Hoksang" would have been labelled as a concise piano exercise without the amazing tonal decay and "mistakes" at the end of each melodic phrase, while the vaguely disquieting "Second Fahrkunst" could let you imagine that the above-mentioned absorption woke up sleeping ghosts, who devour the graceful composure of the previous "Hoksang" till the moment it totally fades out. The most fascinating aspect of the following track "Boyd 1970" is the fact that sounds played by a pianist, who repeats a lesson about rhythmic cadences, walking bass line or simple stride to a mediocre trainee by an exhausted and bored to tears teacher, while the resounding chords in the beginning of "School of Ecofisk" seem to drown in the arthritic tonal knots that strangle melody over the track, whose schizophrenic nuance partially affects the feebly classy tone, which opens the amazing nine minutes of the final "Lassome", before the piece slips down a sheer hole.



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