Music Reviews

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Artist: Snog
Title: Babes In Consumerland
Format: CD
Label: Metropolis (@)
Rated: *****
If you really think that Rammstein embody the highest expressive peak of musical criticism against consumerism, pop culture or whatever let you think they could be agit-prop just because they discommode firefighters, electricians, model agencies, porn producers and German interpreters, you could revise your personal rank with better-informed agitators like talented and evergreen Australian music agitator David Thrussel aka Snog, who manages to stuff his songs with high-quality electro samples and wisely provocative lyrics. We already introduced an appetizer from this great album, the potential forthcoming and definitively more suitable (more suitable than The Star-Spangled Banner...) American nathional anthem in the light of recent establishied spy stories or a potential hymn of forthcoming NWO empire "Everything Is Under Control". All its (many) literary and cultural references are exhaustively explained in linear notes by Alvin Lucia, who wisely introduces Snog's mastermind as the harbinger or, to use his own words, one of the torchbear of 'conspiracy-pop', whose critique cannot but "emerge from the margins, the 'outsider' as shepherd or protector of the bewildered flock, in an overtly stygian and wolverine landscape" and refers to his fictional gender evolution - you could listen to songs like the one he tributes to Otto Rahn to understand what he means... - by linking it to the evolution oh fis sly poeticism and polemicism: "Though (arguably) never more strident as a lyricist, this recording presents an uncharted minefield of pun, punditry and literary allusion. A gaudy, glib and sexually undelineated Oscar Wilde posing mischievously as a street sweeper, while nocturnally inscribing the great novel. A novel that, through no accident, describes exactlyt where we are. Here. Now. Lost. (Almost) alone.". From the musical viewpoint, "Babes In Consumerland" sunds closer to albums like "The Last Days Of Rome" (2007), but Snog's stylistical globules, focusing on a rocking and highly danceable electro structure with emoblism of techno clots and amazing and ironic hints to pop music bubbles which could cause hysterical giggles, enhanced by the usual unsparing sarcasm as well as by a plenty of contributors such as Atom TM (PS3100), Felix Kubin (MS-20), Ash Wednesday (former collaborator of Einsturzende Neubauten playing on his AKS), Australian guitar player John Justin Stewart aka Ad Astra and The City Of Prague Philharmonic Choir. I could mention the French-pop quotes while he repeats "have you sucked some cock today" on "The new cocksucker blues", which is less pornish and more meaningful than you can guess, the proper mocking of dark-oriented oc/cultists which mainly feed their beliefs on Internet by the bittersweet funny song "Soul Invictus" where he vaguely quotes darkwave and witch-house sonorities on epiphanic lyrics, which for instance say "Oh the Internet/Will not save your life/There's no respite/Despite/The hype...Automatic masturbation through a wire/Why do you not tire?/Of perpetual stimulation/The knee-jerk infomercial orgams"), the iconic and ironic ode to pessism in fashion dynamics on "Bleak Is My Favourite Chic" and so on. Snog's sarcam spits more fire than above-mentioned Rammstein and I could say "Babes In Consumerland" is maybe its ripest fruit.



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