Music Reviews

cover
Artist: Near Paris
Title: Near Paris
Format: 12"
Label: Medical Records
Rated: *****
Near Paris was a duo from Columbus, Ohio and was composed by Gerald F. Nelson and Dana Riashi. Originally they were in Post Industrial Noise along with Robert Crise, band that born in 1980 and disbanded in 1983 after producing a 8" flexy disc for their songs "Symphony Of A Mind"/"COTA City Salsa" and participating to a tape compilation. In 1985 the duo reunited as Near Paris and started to gather attention and popularity in the Columbus music scene and had opened for such bands as Section 25. They often played in art galleries as well as worked on original scores for local dance troupes and other art-related endeavors. They also had booked a gig in London and were ready to leave but suddenly they decided otherwise and parted ways. On their musical career they released only a four tracks 12' EP which surfaced online in 2010 on the Crispy Nuggets blog. Thanks the Crispy Nuggets/Medical Records collaboration, we have the possibility to check that EP plus seven unreleased tracks the band recorded at the same time. "Visions","Shattered Glass", "Ceiling" and "Believe Me" were the tracks originally on the 12" and they were a mix of upbeat new wave with synthpop inserts where the guitar arpeggios, Dana melodic voice and synth catchy lines were the main elements. Also the unreleased tracks follow a similar path and it's a fortune that songs like the sensual "Why Baby", the minimal synth melodic "Nine-7-9" and "Like A Man" (lovers of Kas Product don't have to miss these tunes) and the mysterious "Hey You" won't stay in a dusty closet no more. Sadly, in October of 2012, just prior to completion of this project, Gerald passed away, so this reissue is a tribute to his art. This reissued is presented on 180gram oxblood opaque high-quality vinyl in a limited edition of 650 copies and you can check the tracks here http://medicalrecords.bandcamp.com/album/near-paris-mr-019



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