Music Reviews

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Artist: Obtane, Giorgio Gigli, Tin Man (@)
Title: Analysis of a Nihilist Who Wants to Become Famous
Format: 12"
Label: Zooloft (@)
Distributor: Rubadub
Rated: *****
I'm pretty sure you could have arrived to this review for the magnetic attraction exerted by the title of this release. Well, it doesn't concern an essay of Kroker bros, a raving Discordianism sacred text or a philosophical libel by some post-modernist thinker or agit-prop, even if this release on the nice label Zooloft could be fitted for similar readings. I could certainly be influenced by the verbose titles as well as their foggy apocalyptic taxonomy, but the first musical term of comparison coming up to my mind is a possible one with Black Lung, the project of David Thrussel, as he coined similar titles to properly frame from the conceptual viewpoints his obscure rhythmical driving, inbued with dystopian "fictional" themes. The matter is that all the perceptions evoked by the tracks of this project signed by Obtane and Giorgio Gigli and featuring a track by the Austrian producer Tin Man are not so fictional nowadays. The first track entitled Social Distruction sounds to be the first nightmare of a nihilist who wants to become famous, picturing a society suffering from a sort of cannibalism whereas it prevails the sadistic pleasure to see other people's mishaps - even if the consideration according to which this is a peculiarity of our age could be criticised on the basis of the evidence, for instance, mishaps or bad luck has always been one of the columns of comedies since ancient times...maybe an evidence human genre is basically cruel... - and its obscure stepping over the ticking 12-minutes lasting with muted acid sounds and a sort of suffocated didgeridoo reminding parts of the weaponry of the mentioned sound-artist. Just turn the vynil on the other side to keep on feeding paranoid thoughts: the first track is the one assembled by Tin Man, a sort of slow motion dub-techno, which gradually insinuates while bringing the listener into a vortex of intimate thoughts wheras every beat could sound like a drop over the icy surface of the consistency of the most automatic side of the world we're living in. A disquieting bassline on a nervously mechanical set of sounds and what looks like beetles' droning or snakes' hissing prevails over the whole progress of the final appalling track, wisely entitled Individual Submission To The System, evoking the awareness about the dramatically unescapable swallowing of decadent fate. It could sound a little bit paranoid, but it cannot be but the result of the impression anyone had about our society, often suffocating what was known as human feeling.



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