Music Reviews

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Artist: Dmitry Mazurov (@)
Title: Creature on a Lavatory Pan
Format: CD
Label: Electroshock Records (@)
Distributor: Eurock Distribution
Rated: *****
This has got to be one of the most interesting albums I've received in the latest batch from Chain D.L.K. HQ. Dmitry Mazurov is an artist on the cutting edge Russian Electroshock Records label, and his eclectic album, 'Creature on a Lavatory Pan' certainly fits within Electroshock's roster. The title is much creepier than the music, which is a mixture of dark ambient, semi-classical and cinematic soundscape. Although Dmitry's artwork for the CD cover does show a bizarre creature on a lavatory pan (actually, it looks more like a toilet) I think it is more macabre and overt than the music, which is subtle and sublime. Opening with a brief piece titled 'Abyss' which sets a ghostly dark ambient tone, more light is shed in 'Luminos' which follows, as medium tempo piano arpeggios play over a sustained nebulous background of strings. It adds an aura of mystery. Sparse piano melody follow, accented in places by the string ensemble. Gradually, a theme develops through more orchestration. Way cool! It is like the soundtrack for a movie in the imagination.

'Burevo' plunges the listener into a fantastical environment where many subtle elements (both musical and noises) coalesce into an other-worldly soundscape, a subterranean hive of activity and elemental movement. I could imagine this as background of a mysterious (not your 'shoot-em-up' type) video game. 'Depths' goes even deeper with very low frequency drone, subsonics and bubbling liquid. One gets the impression of a number of aliens creatures moving through this environment, although what they may be up to is oblique.

On 'Surovitsa' you get the impression of something slogging through some type of pebbly terra, finally reaching an area where strange lifeforms hold sway. There is such a collage of different, yet purposeful sounds, some acoustic, some electronic. An eclectic guitar (by Jury Starosotnikov) plays a suspenseful sustained tonal rise (think Pink Floyd in Umma Gumma days) that culminates into a brief resounding 'BLANG' for lack of a better description. Frenetic string scrapes on the bridge leading into a wailing entity while low, slow moving orchestration fills in the background.

'Lethargie' puts the listener on more solid footing, as a melancholic slow-moving theme plays out with higher strings accented by the occasional chime. Very classical sounding. There is a sweet and sad feel to this piece, and understated drama. 'Mask for Delicate Aesthetes' is the longest track on the album at 14:35. It begins atmospherically, but soon a rhythmic sequence comes into play. It comes and goes as synth ambience fills in the background. This may be as close as it come to anything conventional (and I use that word loosely) in the realm of IDM, more Autechre-style than anything else. Eventually the sequence disappears and is replaced by more ominous electronics'¦think Klaus Schulz being kind of 'out there'. An Enoesque melodic passage follows, and I have come to realize that this album is absolute cinematic genius. I don't think I have ever heard anything like it. A stronger melodic theme develops toward the end with some phantomesque violin courtesy of Oleg Huhua while sporadic noises erupt in the background. Magic, pure magic.

'Oblivion' uses a subtle industrial loop and floating sustained chords and electronic pads to create an atmosphere that is both cosmic and tremulous. 'Reminiscences' puts the piano upfront again with supporting orchestral elements, developing a theme, then playing a fantasy on it. I am reminded of Harold Budd. Then dramatic percussion kicks in for effect. Sometimes I hear strains of Satie, sometimes Wojceich Kilar, surely other soundtrack composers too; you are bound to come up with your own parallels.

The final two tracks on the album, 'Awe' and 'Sisters of Gloom' are no less enthralling but I am running out of descriptive adjectives. If you're not checking into where you can buy this CD by now, I suppose there isn't anything more I can say about it. But you should buy it. It's that damn good.



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