Music Reviews

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Artist: CRIMINAL ASYLUM (@)
Title: Zeit
Format: CD
Label: Rustblade (@)
Distributor: Masterpiece Distribution
Eight years after their debut album released by Radio Luxor titled "Choice", Cryminal Asylum are back with a new full length titled ZEIT. Released by Rustblade, the new album sees Criminal Asylum presenting thirteen tracks (one of them is a cover of Suicide's "Rocket USA") where the music become more minimal and extreme track after track. If the opening "Erased" is a good cold wave track with Mirosa's vocals in evidence, already with "Fear Of Life Eat My Soul" the band change the atmosphere by using obsessive rhythms and heavily filtered whispered vocals (Italian recitative lyrics about the difficult of living). "Ladies And Gentlemen - Welcome To The Violence Mk I" and "Ladies And Gentlemen - Welcome To The Violence Mk II" are even more obsessive and create a cold effect where the treated "Faster pussycat! kill! Kill!" samples are mixed with looped electronics which get an industrial e.b.m. treatment on the second version. The same goes for "Paranoid Disco Dance III" and "Paranoid Disco Dance IV", where the first one sounds more analog electro (but always keeping a repetitive structure) and the second one more industrial. The Suicide's cover is really extreme and it sounds almost disturbing because of its distorted high frequencies based monophonic sounds. With "Seeing Your Pain Again" we have an electro industrial tune a la Die Form while the following "Spear Of Life" is a little more dancey (a relief after all the previous cold hypnotic atmospheres). "Die By The Code (The Way Of The Samurai)" mixes analog dance sounds with a semi improvised structure where dissonant melodies clash creating a particular background for a spoken word taken from the "Ghost dog" movie. "The White Empty" and "When the gods call" close the album keeping always alive that sensation of uneasiness that permeates most of the album.



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