Music Reviews

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Artist: Glok
Title: Dissident
Format: CD & Vinyl
Label: Bytes
Andy Bell- not the Erasure one, the one from Ride and the one previously a bassist with Oasis- yes, that Oasis- wanted to keep his middle-aged-guitarist status a secret so he could put out some much more synthwave works without prejudice and preconception, so for a couple of years, Glok was a mystery. The veil is now lifted, but given my lack of familiarity with Ride or affinity with Oasis, I find myself able to review it without prejudice anyway.

The nearly-20-minute title track is very much in the latter-day Tangerine Dream mould- a thoroughly digital, slowly changing and progressive bit of synthwave that’s not overtly retro but isn’t old fashioned either, decorated with enough care and detail to keep things balanced between interesting and mesmeric.

The rest of the tracks are less ambitious, but a bit broader in tone. “Kolokol” is sonically in the same ballpark, but with a more subdued structure that brings it closer to mellow belearic techno, but with the drums turned right down and the synth washes brought forward to dominate the track. “Pulsing” channels the 90’s trance vibes of Salt Tank or Union Jack into that format, to very successful effect and with a positive tone that makes it a highlight.

The four four-minute tracks that make up the rest of side B feel more like miscellaneous experiments and unfinished pieces than a coherent album conclusion, but they’re not without their merit. “Weaver” is faintly trip-hoppy, with a nice guitar melody line, but with a slightly flat and forgettable groove that perhaps skirts too close to library music, while “Projected Sounds” is gentle plinking over a Kraftwerk-esque rhythm pattern. The twangy guitar and synth blend in “Cloud Cover” is reminiscent of State Of Grace but without the vocal, and somehow ends up sound tired rather than relaxed, but final piece “Exit Through The Skylight”’s more complex drum patterns and just faintly toothy synth work provides a more interesting flavour to conclude with.

It’s the title track that really shines here, and along with “Pulsing”, the admission price is certainly justified, but it does run out of steam somewhat before the end.



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