Music Reviews

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Artist: Daimon (@)
Title: Dust
Format: CD
Label: Silentes Minimal Editions (@)
Rated: *****
I was unfamiliar with this band, but their Facebook page describes Daimon as “Obscure deep drone audio-visual project run by Paolo Monti (The Star Pillow), Nicola Quiriconi (Vipcancro, Lisca Records), Simon Balestrazzi (T.A.C., Dream Weapon Ritual, Candor Chasma, AZOTH, etc)." As an aside, I was interested to see that this label came out of the ashes of Amplexus, which used to put out gorgeous releases back in the day. Now on to the music itself. The band In The Nursery had a series called “Optical Music.” I always liked what that term evokes – what Aristotle would call “bringing before the eyes.” It is this sense of bringing an image to mind that Daimon excels at. The music is cinematic, evoking different emotions as it evolves and shifts over time. The album opens with “All the Dead Dreamers” (a nod to H.P. Lovecraft, perhaps), which begins as a quiet droning number, but slowly shifts over time, increasing in dissonance and overall noisiness. If this were a movie scene, this would the point where the protagonists realized that the water on the lake had become far too still and the birds have vanished, just before a creature broke the surface of the water and bit someone in half. “So High So Close” dials it back a bit, with vibraphone breaking through the drone. The overall feeling here is a long journey, leaving home for an uncertain destination. The piece builds on itself, over and over, as time and the miles stretch out before you. “Leonard” brings the dissonance to front stage, opening with bits of metallic tapping and percussion, but getting more and more harsh. It never becomes harsh noise, but the overall feel is that of pressure, grinding away at you. If there is a story to tell, it is that not all battles are outside of one’s mind. Finally, “Awash” closes the album with dissonance in full effect in their droning wall of sound. Bits of clanking metal and horn squawks peek through, broken up by a brief spoken word passage before ending with what sounds like overdriven woodwinds. Overall, this is nicely done and does an excellent job of evoking a sense of imagery to go along with the sound. Well worth checking out for fans of noisy dronescapes. This album weighs in at around 44 minutes.



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