Music Reviews

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Artist: Populäre Mechanik
Title: Hi-Fi Is Sweeping the Country!
Format: 2 x 12" vinyl
Label: Edition Telemark
Wolfgang Seidel was in a short-lived band PopulÄre Mechanik which disbanded in the 1980’s, then in 2005 formed a new band with the same name, but where he was the only member in common. This is a double LP compilation of material from between 2005 and 2014, from that incarnation of the band. However when listening to it, you could readily believe that some of these hard-edged prog and experimental pieces could have been recorded in the late ‘60’s or the ‘70s, with long wigged-out works coupling electric guitar, complex live percussion and evocative gritty vocals making this psychedelic prog rock writ underground or garage rock writ pretentiously, depending on how you look at it.

The apparently improvised vocals are mostly German, with occasional exceptions such as the English “Abstract Days” and “Blooming Carpet”, but it’s not for that reason that those track are highlights- the groove and progression on it is notably more engaging than some of the others. The ordering is unclear but it’s easy to assume from the listening order that you’re listening chronologically and that the move to English came towards the end of the period.

In some tracks, like the rather unrepresentative opener “20 Ways To Improve Your Home”, there’s a strong showing for samples, loops and tape trickery. At points it sounds a little like the tape-bending experiments of the 1960’s that George Martin helped to popularise, at other points it’s more structured and has some slight shadows of the 90’s bigbeat era of sample eclecticism. It’s across the minority of the tracks though, more’s the pity as it represents some of the most innovative elements of it. Again if this is a chronological collection, about which I’m unclear, it would seem that the band moved away from it- which is a shame.

The nearly-eighteen-minute long closer “Psychedelic Mechanics” functions well as both the end to the journey, and as a self-contained unfolding work in its own right, showing a defter sense of dynamism and melody than was exposed in some of the earlier, more raucous pieces.

With its title and artwork referencing the ‘50’s and since I’ve mentioned every other decade from the second half of the twentieth century onwards, this is clearly a release that crosses time- but does seem to be rather focussed on looking backwards. Lovers of psychedelic rock who want to hear something new that sounds old have come to the right place.



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