Music Reviews

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Artist: Andrew Tuttle
Title: s/t
Format: CD + Download
Label: Someone Good
Andrew Tuttle has collaborated or performed with a wide body of artists- Matmos and Julia Holter included- but can still be described as a “best-kept secret” of Australian music, rather than a truly established artist. Hopefully this release, his third album, will help change that.

It’s an unusual homemade concoction of banjo strumming, acoustic guitar work and synthesizer drones and atmospherics that successfully hybridises country music banjo tones into an electronic space. It’s always shifting, either in tempo or style, sometimes teetering towards energetic hoe-down knees-up territory (though thankfully not too close), and sometimes way off into sparse melancholic improvisations over single synthesized chords- whilst generally retaining a fairly bright atmosphere and never quite devolving into overlong grumpiness (“Reflections On The Twilight” is the closest it comes to this)..

“Transmission Interruption” exemplifies the whole work, so if you fancy checking out a single track on Spotify, perhaps make it that one. “Boarding Zone” has quite an expansive, Americana-type feel to it that makes the pulsing synths seem like a rare but honoured guest, helped along by a quite catchy melody motif. Some tracks, like “Garden Development”, have their edge taken away a little by slightly excessive effects processing. “A Winding River” has got shades of Mike Oldfield’s more laidback guitar meanderings at points, without the more showy Spanish guitar flourishes, before “The Coldest Night” wraps things up in quite a New Age-y fashion.

It’s a properly unusual construction, and at 33 minutes, it’s simply too short, in a good way. As an experimental fusion of guitar and banjo playing with complementary electronics, it’s a definite success, and Tuttle clearly knows his own strengths too.



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