Music Reviews

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Artist: Mondo Flockard
Title: s/t
Format: CD
Label: Tone List (@)
Rated: *****
I was not familiar with Mondo Flockard, but this is the work of Melbourne-based drummer Maria Moles. The label describes it this way: “You're not sure where you are, sounds feel close-up and far-away all at once, with only the memory of bells and chimes keeping you in familiar territory. A driving rhythm sets in and marches you into uncharted parts of the land - bells ring and snares crack right in your ears as a guitar string rings through a misty valley and a wave of rich resonance slowly washes over. At last when things seem to slow down, the drums are everywhere and nowhere, a solo from behind a veil, whilst a spacious melody is a much needed reminder of home.” Sounds promising, so let’s see if it lives up to the description. “New Age Tape Bath” starts off the disc, and sounds like listening to a CD of a recording of a toy factory where all of the toys are making noises, but the disc is badly scratched and skipping all over the place. There’s a lot going on here that keeps it interesting. Next up, we have “Dance If There Are Seven.” Frantic percussion that sounds like it is done on a variety of metal cans with droney synth over it opens this track up, before bringing in snare drum and more slow moving synth and random cymbals. Lots of percussion, and as a drummer I enjoyed this immensely. “Gazing Over” brings it all together with jangling jingle bells and percussion with an improvised synth line that seems almost random, like someone trying out a keyboard over a low bass hum. I liked the percussion, but the synth felt a bit out of place here. Overall, this was a pleasant listen. If you want more percussion (and not just cowbell) this is one for you. I would be quite interested to see this performed live. This album weighs in at around 14 minutes. This is limited to 100 copies, so if this sounds like your cup of tea, you’ll want to get it quickly.



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