Jun 262013
 

Since 1992, French electronic musician Rémy Pelleschi has used his Mlada Fronta project to compose industrial soundscapes ranging from haunting atmospheres to tribal rhythms to cinematic immersions of the highest order of technical perfection. Owing to the very well-received club hit “XB-33,” which Discogs.com correctly refers to as a club “anthem even,” Mlada Fronta was on everyone’s radar in 1999 when the now defunct Flatline Records put out High Tension, the project’s breakout album. Following this, Pelleschi started Parametric Records and between 2001 and 2005 released truly captivating electronic music (on both audio and DVD) and gained attention from the likes of AllMusic.com, who called Mlada Fronta “nothing short of an extended immersive experience.”

Recognizing the immense importance of Pelleschi’s work as Mlada Fronta, Artoffact Records presents Every Thing, a 10 CD boxset that collects all previous Mlada Fronta releases, including bonus tracks, remixes, extra mp3 files, and all video material. The boxset is housed in a high quality, hard cover digibook including 40 page booklet, all designed by Pelleschi. Each release has been remastered in 32bit 96kHz (hi-definition) using only state of the art analog and digital hardware at Pelleschi’s own QFG Studios. Artoffact Records will also be releasing the entire Mlada Fronta discography as digital releases on iTunes, complete with exclusive PDF booklets.

http://www.stormingthebase.com/mlada-fronta-every-thing-10cd-boxset/

“Nothing short of an extended immersive experience.” -Theo Kavadias, AllMusic.com

“Mlada Fronta is a machine that plays tricks to your imagination and controls your psyche.” -Christophe Labussière, Premonition Magazine

“Like music from another galaxy!” -Side-Line

“Stunning work.” -Igloo Mag

Jun 262013
 
Since 1992, French electronic musician Rémy Pelleschi has used his Mlada Fronta project to compose industrial soundscapes ranging from haunting atmospheres to tribal rhythms to cinematic immersions of the highest order of technical perfection. Owing to the very well-received club hit “XB-33,” which Discogs.com correctly refers to as a club “anthem even,” Mlada Fronta was on everyone's radar in 1999 when the now defunct Flatline Records put out High Tension, the project's breakout album. Following this, Pelleschi started Parametric Records and between 2001 and 2005 released truly captivating electronic music (on both audio and DVD) and gained attention from the likes of AllMusic.com, who called Mlada Fronta “nothing short of an extended immersive experience.”

Recognizing the immense importance of Pelleschi's work as Mlada Fronta, Artoffact Records presents Every Thing, a 10 CD boxset that collects all previous Mlada Fronta releases, including bonus tracks, remixes, extra mp3 files, and all video material. The boxset is housed in a high quality, hard cover digibook including 40 page booklet, all designed by Pelleschi. Each release has been remastered in 32bit 96kHz (hi-definition) using only state of the art analog and digital hardware at Pelleschi's own QFG Studios. Artoffact Records will also be releasing the entire Mlada Fronta discography as digital releases on iTunes, complete with exclusive PDF booklets.

http://www.stormingthebase.com/mlada-fronta-every-thing-10cd-boxset/

“Nothing short of an extended immersive experience.” -Theo Kavadias, AllMusic.com

“Mlada Fronta is a machine that plays tricks to your imagination and controls your psyche.” -Christophe Labussière, Premonition Magazine

“Like music from another galaxy!” -Side-Line

“Stunning work.” -Igloo Mag

Jun 262013
 


MINKS Record Release Show 

August 9th At Glasslands

Tides End Out August 6th

MINKS are happy to announce their record release show at Glasslands on August 9th, celebrating the release of Tides Endtheir sophomore album due out August 6th.

An album of bright, synthy layers and catchy pop hooks, Tides End creates infectious energy that swells around you – experiencing it live is a must. 

Click here to purchase your tickets 


Also, be sure to check out the first two singles from Tides End, "Everything's Fine" & "Painted Indian"

Tides End is the second MINKS album, but you could say it’s a world away from the first. Moving out of New York City to try and cure a bout of writer's block, frontman/songwriter Sonny Kilfoyle wound up in the East End of Long Island. Surrounded by water on three sides, it's the same place that drew Warhol, Pollock, de Kooning, Steinbeck and more to escape the constant barrage of information of the urban landscape.

 
The escapist mentality of the location directly and literally affected "Tides End," as the LP is named for a beachfront estate Sonny had wandered upon one day while out for a drive. Occupied by one family for generations, who after financial decline, are now forced to sell all they own. The experience of seeing old East Coast wealth, surrounded by beautiful Rococo paintings yet no modern appliances, was the initial spark to record the LP. Kilfoyle himself purchased a portrait "Margot," which inspired and named one of the LP's catchiest tracks. Visions of sipping gin and lemonade's on the dunes with their future in peril could be something clearly reflected in the choruses of "Everything's Fine" and "Playboys of the Western World."  Themes of affluence, decadence and eventual decay in spite of the outside world are everywhere, even by the skull and shells amidst an explosion of color in the Everest Hall painting that graces the cover. This is "Tides End," indeed.

 
Armed with a new arsenal of material, Sonny connected with producer and engineer, Mark Verbos, who had moved to New York from Berlin after a prolific career in techno and electronic music. The entire album was recorded at Mark’s studio, a former electric room in the base of the Brooklyn side of the Williamsburg Bridge. "It was actually a very uninspiring and uncreative but it forced us to use our imagination and find new ways to work together," says Kilfoyle. So when they encountered a creative impasse they would consult The KLF’s “manual” or Verbos would choose a card from Brian Eno’s “Oblique Strategies."  To clear the cobwebs of influence, the producer chose to only allow Sonny to listen to Seal, Simply Red, Enigma, and early Chicago house music during the recording process. This helped build texture and depth in a recording that blended ambience and immediacy to the established foundation of all the of MINKS' previous work.

 
The result is not just a romantic trip into isolation, but a melodic and warm experience to immerse yourself in. It's a pop record, with all the hooks and harmonies you'd expect from that, delivered with experience, depth and hope.

TIdes End Tracklisting 

1. Romans 
2. Everything's Fine

3. Margot 
4. Playboys of the Western World 
5. Weekenders 
6. Painted Indian 

7. Hold Me Now
8. Doomed and Cool
9. Ark of Life
10. Tides End 

Jun 252013
 

Mannequin is supremely happy to announce these phenomenal new releases
all of which will hit the stores on July 14th 2013:

DUST – ONSET OF A DECIMATION – MNQ 039
Acid House / Combat Techno from Brooklyn, NY, USA

LIGHT HOUSE – IN THEIR IMAGE – MNQ 038
Minimal Cold Waves from Portland, USA

 

MNQ 039 Dust – Onset of Decimation 12″ Ep

 

Dust

DUST is a contemporary ouroboros of acid house, combat techno, and late italo. A collective consisting of avant garde Korean noise goddess Greem Jellyfish, psych musician/model Angela Chambers, dungeon wizard/tech genius audio engineer Michael Sherburn, and DIY nightlife entrepreneur /DJ John Barclay, they are headquartered at infamous psychedelic/art/techno mansion Trip House in the jungles of Deep Bushwick. DUST utilizes both vintage hardware (909, 303, Juno 60) and HD cinematic soundscapes to create a heavy, lavish experience.
Founded in 2012 by Sherburn and Barclay, DUST was originally a dark italo project. Soon Chambers and later Jellyfish were incorporated to enliven the dark magic with their sporadic vocals, and live energy. DUST released “Past Future,” their first EP on Brooklyn’s Low Life Inc.
DUST performed their first live set alongside Gatekeeper, Supreme Cuts, and Teengirl Fantasy at the Dustbowl, a DIY venue in Chicago, and has since performed and/or DJ’ed alongside Light Asylum, Kim Ann Foxman, Phuture, DJ Pierre, Pictureplane and Steve Summers. Also, DUST serves as resident DJs at “Tropical Goth” a monthly party at Bossa Nova Civic Club, which Barclay owns, in Brooklyn.

– 12” EP on black vinyl
– Limited edition of 300 copies
– Artwork by Giandomenico Carpentieri

Strongly recommended to fans of Phuture, Cybotron, Gatekeeper, Legowelt, International Music System, Future Sound Of London.

Tracks:
A1 – ONSET OF DECIMATION
A2 – CAVE DWELLER
B1 – NOTHING FEELS GOOD
B2 – IM MELTING
More online resources for Dust

Onset of Decimation (Official Video)
Facebook 
Website

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MNQ 038 Light House – In their Image 12″ Ep

 

The End of Civilization

Mannequin Records is simply elated to present the debut 12” EP from Light House.
Light House have been kicking around Portland for two years. The band contains Chris Relyea, an ex member from The Rapture, Dawn Sharp and Brooks Blackhawk from Atriarch. Excellent dark wave with spacious mixes, minimal synths, reverb drenched guitars and eerie malevolent vocals that either pierces your heart or your spinal cord (I haven’t decided which as yet, but Dawn Sharp is most excellent).
Originally released in United States by Freee record label in 2012 and recorded on pure analog tape, ‘In Their Image’ EP illuminates the romantic and elemental nature of Light House’s dreamlike sound, a moody, theatrical dirge which brings to mind classic 4AD acts such as Dead Can Dance and This Mortal Coil.
To celebrate this relaunch Light House will be touring America and Europe, hitting the West Coast in mid June to coincide with Warm Leatherette in San Francisco, then onto New York and making their way along the East Coast.
Light House is music that lulls the Etheric body awake, in a hypotetical world where Tropic Of Cancer meets Soft Metals.

– 12’’ EP on black vinyl
– Limited edition of 300 copies
– Artwork by Giandomenico Carpentieri

Strongly recommended to fans of Cocteau Twins, This Mortal Coil, Dead Can Dance, 4AD, Factory Records, Minimal Wave.

Tracks:
In Their Image
Watchword
The Walls Want Communion
Seven Seas You SentMore online resources for Light House

The Walls Want Communion (Official Video)
Facebook
Website

Jun 252013
 

logo

We had a chat with talented multidisciplinary artist Raoul Sinier, who tacked towards a more personal and accessible album called “Welcome To My Orphanage” after a decade of overdrive in the electro scene. Both music and Sinier’s vocals  waver between bright and dark, lively and desperate atmospheres which go beyond a clear and constrictive notion of “genre”. Raoul Sinier’s “Welcome To My Orphanage” comes out on Good Citizen Factory.

 

Chain D.L.K.: Hi Raoul. How are you?

Raoul Sinier:  Hello. I’m fine, thanks.

 

Chain D.L.K.: I’m pretty sure you don’t really need an introduction from me, but I’d like you to introduce yourself to our readers in your own words and I’d like you to also introduce the direction of your artistic/musical research and whatever else might be useful to know in order to understand who’s speaking?

Raoul Sinier:  I’m a French artist, doing music, painting, video, and writing lyrics now, with a personal universe, combining dark aesthetic, tiny creatures, weird moods, irony and humor, headless corpses and a vast range of emotions. I think that my music is my main thing. I don’t really think too much, and don’t like conceptual art, I let myself go with the flow and see what comes out of it.

 

interview picture 1

Chain D.L.K.: Is there any logical or narrative connection between all your albums? If so, how would you describe its plot?

Raoul Sinier:  Sure, but it’s more about an aesthetic than a clearly defined plot. It’s more like a continuous wave, going from abstract hiphop to electronica, to complicated harshness, to peaceful again, to singing, etc… with a common dark poetry, for lack of a better term.

The real plot is here, the fact that I never force myself into anything, I only create when I’m inspired, and if I don’t have anything for months then it’s simply too bad. Fortunately it doesn’t happen too often.

 

Chain D.L.K.: I’ve always been fascinated by those freaky entities which crowd you clips… how do you create and devise them?

Raoul Sinier: I don’t really know, I like out-of-place characters and situations, I like absurd, sleazy and amusing scenes. In the videos there is something else: the technical aspect. Since I do everything by myself, I have to rely on my skills before writing something. I can’t do a crowd of photorealistic creatures and robots assembling into a giant face or stuff like this. I would love to but it would take so much resources and time, especially since I’m learning everything by myself with trial and error. So sometimes it’s easier to write a video about a piece of raw chicken meat coming back to life. Having said that, I love those tiny weird and cute ones. I especially love to give life to faceless creatures. I have more flexibility with animation from paintings, but also other limitations.

 

Chain D.L.K.: Apropos of that, why did you cook that nice yellow crab in “Brain Kitchen”? And what about that monster with anus orifices instead of eyes? 🙂

Raoul Sinier: Somehow that’s what it took to bring this little story back down to earth, to everyday life. And I thought it was funny that everything you saw on this video was just a crab’s dream, just before being boiled. This is really funny to me, showing a lot of incredible characters and epic scenes which end up in a simple kitchen, with a regular dude cooking in his underwear… About the anus eyed monster, I’ve got no idea where that came from…

 

Chain D.L.K.: When I saw some of your clips, the notorious first movie by Lynch, “Eraserhead”, sometimes came to my mind… Any connection between your videoclips and Lynch’s “Eraserhead”?

Raoul Sinier: Yes, most definitely, but I’m not always a Lynch fan. I really love “Eraserhead” for its aesthetic and storytelling, but I’m not too much into some other movies where… well… I don’t understand a bit of it. I think it’s good for short films and music videos, but I’m not comfortable with full movies that more or less say “find your own explanation, I don’t care”… I’m not saying they are bad movies, but it’s not my thing. I like being blown away with solid and well thought out stories.

 

Chain D.L.K.: I don’t mean to pry, but may I ask why you titled it “Welcome To My Orphanage”?

Raoul Sinier: Ah, of course! I’ll try to explain. It’s all about freedom. The orphanage represents the place where you are on your own and have to give up some of what you’ve been taught, even if you may feel a bit left apart. And I’m not talking about my or anyone’s actual parents or family, it’s an image of a place in your mind where you are your own leader, where you overcome your roots and societal heritage. It has a lot to do with self-alienation, too. And of course it’s a way to write weird and interesting lyrics.

 

Chain D.L.K.: Who is really welcome to your orphanage? What’s the price to get on board?

Raoul Sinier:  Everyone who wants to get rid of useless obstacles is their life. This orphanage is not a place owned by anyone. This is what I’m talking about in “Ruined Map”, where I give a friend a map with directions to the orphanage but he can’t make it because he keeps on drawing stupid shit on the map. What I want to say here is that of course it may appear comfortable to live without questioning anything, but is it really interesting in the long run? This character is ruining the map on purpose, and still pretending to try to get there.

So of course it’s free. It only depends on what you want from life.

 

interview picture 2

© chroniquesautomatiques.com

Chain D.L.K.: Is the “she” you sing about on “A Million Years” (very beautiful song) the same “she” of “She Is a Lord”? Who is “she”?

Raoul Sinier: Thanks. No, it isn’t. “She is a Lord” was written by Sylvie Frétet and it’s a self-portrait, very abstract and personal. She used obscure aspects of her life to write something that doesn’t make direct sense but creates great images and narration. Not all songs have to have a meaning or something to explain. In my songs about the orphanage, I have very specific things to say, but I don’t mind if it’s not interpreted in the way I intended. What I want to offer is emotions, subjective emotions, talking straight to the heart. And that’s what I’m looking for as a listener. If the lyrics are moving me, of course it’s even better.

“A Million Years” talks about a guy in love with a monster that cripples him again and again. This one is not related to the orphanage theme, well not directly. This is more about visual images and feelings. Like one of my paintings.

 

Chain D.L.K.: One of the songs your voice was so expressive in is “Cleaning Man”… do you feel anger or envy for that cleaning man who “doesn’t fully understand what’s going on in this place” and “likes when things make sense”?

Raoul Sinier: He’s the orphanage’s janitor. He sees all those people who are considered freaks by the regular and clean society and he doesn’t understand any of it. At the end of the song, we are being told that at some point in the past he was a resident too. You know, always be on your guard. You may think you are conscious and warned but it’s easy to let yourself go and become a sheep. I know… said like this is it’s a bit preachy, that’s why I used a lot of images and situations.

 

Chain D.L.K.: What’s the ideal addressee of the threatening lyrics of “Empty Shell”?

Raoul Sinier:  It’s related to the same thing again, be aware, be hard on yourself, set the stakes high. You think you are great but maybe you are just a piece of shit. Haha, yes it’s brutal, but it’s also funny. And it’s good to be harsh sometimes.

 

Chain D.L.K.: Another meaningful song is “Analog Shit”… what’s the best place to play it loud? Why have you decided to have a robot sing it? 🙂

Raoul Sinier: Oh you can play it wherever you want. Please play it wherever you want. I had this idea quite some time ago, to use a robotic voice. But it’s a bit cliché in electronic music, vocoders and auto-tunes you know… It’s really annoying today. And it’s also an overused trick for electronic musician to add voices without singing or having guest performers. Since I’m singing a lot now, I’m not uncomfortable with this anymore, so I came up with this idea of an actual robot character. And of course this robot hates humans and the lyrics are anti-humans. And even the robot talks about the same theme when he mocks humans for having mortgages, being lost with religions and being stuck with their everyday life.

 

Chain D.L.K.: I have the impression that you argue that decadence and cultural crisis (partially related to the financial one) is a necessary, cathartic and somehow edifying phase for humanity… is it so or not?

Raoul Sinier:  Ah this is interesting. It’s not really about the present situation, it’s more about people who find excuses not to live their life the way they want (in our modern and rich societies, of course). And I’m not talking about extreme behavior or extreme lifestyles, but just about being honest with yourself. Like, do you really want children? Do you really need to work that much? Do you have to be this submissive? Or Rebellious? Do you really have to get married? Are you forced to agree or disagree with your family? Well ok, you got it, the list is endless… Living outside the usual full social pressure is not always easy, but it’s really not that hard, to an extent at least.

 

Chain D.L.K.: Is there anything you’d like listeners to understand after listening to your album?

Raoul Sinier: I’m not sure. Of course I would like them to understand the lyrics the way I intended them, but if not, well it’s okay too. I really don’t mind loving a piece of music without understanding the words, just for my own private pleasure. I tend to think that art, music and painting anyway, is not the proper way to express important insights. For me music is more about pleasure and entertainment, and that doesn’t mean it’s cheap.

But what I would really like the listeners to understand is that music is not about genres and classifications. The singing doesn’t make my music that different from my instrumental days. Some guys are really uptight with this (and they should pay a visit to the orphanage too, haha).

 

Chain D.L.K.: Are you going to bring it on a live stage?

Raoul Sinier:  Sure, I already did but it’s really difficult for someone like me to find gigs. I wish I could do more, but when you are not in a specific musical genre it’s always tricky. And especially with electronic music, if you are not 100% dancefloor, dustep, breakcore or conceptual installation with infinite delays and such, then it’s a bad start for you. The gap between mainstream and underground music seems wider than ever. Can you imagine bands like Primus being signed today? Can you imagine Queen starting today and doing Wembley in a few years? Ok different times, but that’s exactly my point.

So yes, promoters and booking agencies, have a little faith in something just a little bit outside the box and book me! (and many others of course).

 

Chain D.L.K.: Any forthcoming projects (more or less related to this great release)?

Raoul Sinier:  I released two videos for this album so far, “A Million Years” and “Ruined Map”, I plan on doing a new one with the rapping robot, and I got an idea for a 4th one. And we’ll see after that.

 

Chain D.L.K.: To quote your last track “Where You Are”, where would you guess I am at the moment? 🙂

Raoul Sinier:  I assume behind your computer screen but who knows?

Maybe I’m in my room, writing back to you and trying to find a clever ending, but maybe, due to a very unusual turn of events, I’m locked in a box at a party and I can’t get out because I’m dressed up like a fakir and it’s such a pathetic bad joke that I have to wait for the party to end, so I’m replying to you with my smartphone.

“Where you are” is a question to the listener, asking where you are with all those questions about freedom, self-alienation, social pressure and so on. But here again, it can just be the idea of me finding an awesome vowel-modeled synth trick.

 

Chain D.L.K.:  Thanks for answering… anything to add?

Raoul Sinier:  Although it’s very clear in my head, I’m having trouble explaining my orphanage idea, even in french. And I hope I didn’t sound too preachy. The most important thing is my aesthetics, the emotions and images I’m suggesting.

Have fun and thank you!

 

visit Raoul Sinier on the web at: www.raoulsinier.com